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Foglight 5.9.5 - Administration and Configuration Guide

Administering and Configuring Foglight Extending Your Monitoring Reach with Foglight Cartridges Administering Foglight Configure Rules and Metric Calculations to Discover Bottlenecks Customizing Your Foglight Environment with Tooling

Management Server View and Management Server Metrics

The Management Server View dashboard is useful for examining the server performance. It can help you diagnose potential performance problems and identify bottlenecks in your environment.

1
On the navigation panel, under Dashboards, choose Management Server > Servers > Management Server View.
2
Click Choose a Foglight Server and select the server from one or more list entries that appear.
Rule Service: Shows the number of rule and derived metric instances bound to data objects.
Data Service: Shows the ability of the server to keep up with incoming data.
JVM: Shows the memory performance of the JVM in which the server is running.
JDBC Connection Pool: Shows the number of database connections that are in use or available at any time.
Derivation Service: Shows the number of derivation rulettes, errors, and evaluation counts.
Email Sender Service: Shows the number of emails that are sent from the selected Management Server.
FMS Database Size: Shows the size of the database.

Object Groups

Most of the object groups needed for service monitoring already exist. Administrators can use the Object Groups dashboard to classify a group of data and then use the Tier Definition dashboard to subscribe to which data groupings you want to use as tiers. Object groups do not bind to data.

An object group is a mapping to a certain set of data types of the objects you are interested in. Once an object group is defined, its mapping can be evaluated to return these objects. Because the result depends on what exist in Foglight by the time the evaluation is done, its membership list may vary.

Foglight ships with a number of default object groups and subgroups. These groups are marked as Created by Foglight and cannot be changed or deleted.

If an object group is used as a tier, it cannot be deleted. If an object group or object subgroup is used in a rule to define a dynamic group of components in a service, it cannot be deleted.

An object group cannot be used to define a rule in the Service Builder unless it contains more than one subgroup. Conversely, you are not allowed to delete all subgroups from an object group if the object group is used to create a rule to dynamically include a group of components in a service.

1
From the navigation panel under Dashboards, click Services > Object Groups.
The Create Object Group dialog box opens.
4
Ensure the Is Disabled check box is cleared to enable the object group activation.
5
Click Create.

After creating an object group, you need to add one or more subgroups to that group. For more information, see Create an object subgroup.

An object subgroup contains one or more objects, selected using a common criteria, that make up that subgroup.For example you can create a subgroup that contains all agent instances whose names start with “tor”.

The Create Object SubGroup dialog box opens.
Name: Type a name for the object sub-group that is unique in Foglight.
Description: Optional — Type a description of the object subgroup.
Data Type: Type a regular expression that selects the data type of the subgroup. This is a mandatory value. For example, the following expression selects all Foglight agents with the exception of WindowsAgent instances:
Query Conditions: Optional — Type a filter expression that selects specific object instances only. For example, the following expression selects only those object instances that are already selected by the Data Type expression and whose name starts with ‘tor’:
Is Disabled: Ensure the check box is cleared to enable the subgroup activation.
4
Click Test.
5
Click Create.

Use the Tier Definitions dashboard to associate an object group to a tier. A tier is another logical component that references one or more object groups, based on some common criteria. This type of logical structure helps you investigate performance problems associated with multiple objects. For example, to investigate the state of the monitored components within a tier, drill down on a tier and investigate the hosts that are related to it. For more information about services, see the Foglight User Guide.

The object groups that are made available in the Tier Definitions dashboard are based on object groups that were created using the Object Groups dashboard. For more information, see Create an object group.

The Object Groups that you select in the Tier Definitions dashboard appear in the Tier drop down list when selecting a new local or global service using the Service builder dashboard. These tiers are also used in the Service Operations Console, where they show service breakdown by tier.

NOTE: New tiers are hidden by default in the Service Operations Console. To display a new tier, in the Service Operations Console, click Customize Service Operations Console, open the Tier Selector tab, and ensure the newly-created tier is selected. For more information about the Service Operations Console, see the related help page.
1
On the navigation panel under Dashboards, click Services > Tier Definition.

The FMS Overview view is a starting point for performance analysis of the Foglight Management Server. It displays information about the database activity, data service performance, JVM performance, and server load in one unified view.

In federated environments, explore the diagnostics for each individual server: Federation Master, Federation Child, or a standalone Foglight Management Server. To do that, click Choose a Foglight Server and select a host from the list that appears.

This view provides more information on:

Data load summary (Data Service, Inserts per 5 minutes views). In the Inserts per 5 min embedded view, num_rows_inserted_per5min shows the number of rows inserted every five minutes, while avg_insert_per5min shows one-hour average of num_rows_inserted_per5min. Spikes on the Data Service embedded view often indicate some kind of data processing lull such as a high amount of incoming data (seen as an increase in batchesProcessed), or insufficient resources to process incoming data decrease in batchesDiscarded).
Whether there is enough memory (JVM Memory Usage view). In this view, memory_usage shows the heap memory usage, totalMemory shows the amount of total heap memory, and freeMemory is the free heap memory. A sawtooth on the JVM memory graph is normal, but if the amount of memory freed by a garbage collect (such as the height of the sawtooth) is small, you may need more memory on your system. A large topology results in a high amount of incoming data and a decrease in free memory. The amount of free memory should never be zero. If it does reach zero this is an indication to adjust the server configuration.
Whether the load on the server is too high (Server Load Status view). Server load is mostly determined by the memory usage in the JVM old generation. If the server runs out of memory it will go into an “overloaded” state. A server can be in this state and have some memory available in the JVM new generation. If that is the case, the server discards incoming agent data but can continue to service browser interface requests to some degree. If the server remains to be overloaded, it likely needs to be re-configured to have more memory available, or less workload coming from the browser interface and/or the agents.

Database insert spikes, slow processing

Incoming data spikes (batchesProcessed increases), slow processing (batchesDiscarded increases)

Too large topology, too much incoming data (freeMemory increases)

Load is higher than 0.7

The Agents view is designed to see what agents you are running, listed by type. By selecting agent types in the tree, a graph showing the number of agents as a function of time is plotted. This graph is handy for viewing changes to the agents, for example if a number of agents that you did not know about were added, or checking if old agents are properly removed.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Agents.
3
To view agent connectivity, in the Agent Type column, drill-down to the agent type to view its connectivity.

The Baseline Measurements view shows internal database I/O statistics related to baseline computation. A metric baseline is the expected metric range for the given time period. When configured, IntelliProfile computes baselines for metrics, and stores that data in the database.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Baseline Measurements.
The Baseline Measurements view appears in the display area.
Table 17. Look for the following types of information in the Baseline Measurements view.

High peaks in the graph usually indicate an impact on the database performance, depending on the database capabilities.

High peaks in the graph usually indicate an impact on the database performance, depending on the database capabilities.

High values in the graph may be a sign that baselining activities have a high impact on the database performance, depending on the database capabilities.

This graph shows zero values at all times, unless baseline profiles are explicitly removed for trouble-shooting purposes, usually requiring manual intervention.

This graph shows zero values at all times, unless baseline profiles are explicitly removed for trouble-shooting purposes, usually requiring manual intervention.

Normally these values should correspond to those appearing in the Store Call Count graph. If they are greater that means that some attempts failed due to database-related errors.

High peaks in the graph usually indicate an impact on the database performance, depending on the database capabilities.

High peaks in the graph usually indicate an impact on the database performance, depending on the database capabilities.

Outstanding baseline management operations can include enabling or disabling baselines for a particular metric. This graph can be expected to show zero values at all times.

The Connectivity view shows the Foglight connectivity for the JDBC connection pool and the user session count. It summarizes the database connection state from the perspective of the Foglight Management Server. By looking at this view, you can determine if there are enough JDBC connections to service application requests.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Connectivity.
The Connectivity view appears in the display area.

Overused pool indicates a slow database.

High number of sessions results in a high browser interface load, indicating a slow browser interface/server.

The Database Overview view displays the metrics that represent the reads, inserts, and updates of the database rows. These metrics can be used in performance load tests to track the unit load.

Contents of this view includes a drop down to select the host name. Here, you can select a Federation Master, Federation Child, or standalone server. To do that, click Choose a Foglight Server and select a host from the list that appears. It also contains the following embedded views:

The name of the metrics that contain database reads, inserts, and updates depend on the type of the supported database that Foglight uses to store information, as indicated in the following table.

num_rows_deleted

num_rows_inserted

num_rows_updated

innodb_rows_inserted

innodb_rows_inserted_per5min: #innodb_rows_inserted# * 300

avg_inserts_per5min: avg(#innodb_rows_inserted_per5min for 60 minutes#)

qa_db_inserts : select sum(inserts) from sys.dba_tab_modifications where TABLE_OWNER='xxxx'

delta_db_inserts: delta(#qa_db_inserts from QA_DB_INSERTS_Agent_Table_DB_INSERT_COUNT#)

delta_avg_per5min: avg(#delta_db_inserts for 60 minutes#)

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Database Overview.
The Database Overview view appears in the display area.

High number of database operations may indicate a possible database bottleneck. The cause could be related to a problem on the server sid, such as topology changes.

High load may indicate a possible database bottleneck. Check the database specifications.

May indicate a dirty database buffer, possibly because the innodb pool buffer is too small.

Check if there is anything more than row operations.

This view shows the invocation counts of and time spent on garbage collection. It contains two embedded views:

Copy: This view shows the activity of the ParNew garbage collector, used to reclaim memory in the JVM new generation part of the heap. In most cases, there is no need to be concerned with the data on this view unless the numbers become unreasonable (one hour or higher).
ConcurrentMarkSweep: This view shows the activity of the ConcurrentMarkSweep garbage collector, used to reclaim memory in the JVM old generation part of the heap. In general, the values appearing on this view should stay low. An occasional spike does not indicate any problems (such as once a day). If spikes become frequent, the Foglight Management Server memory allocation may need to be adjusted (for example, by balancing the size of new and old generations). In some cases it might be required to increase the overall Foglight Management Server heap.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Garbage Collector.
The Garbage Collector view appears in the display area.

The Java Virtual Machine (JVM) view provides full details on the JVM memory activity. This view is particularly useful if you are performing detailed JVM tuning for the different memory spaces.

To find out more about the JVM heap generation, observe the spikes on the embedded views. Big spikes with a slow climb are better than small spikes (too little available memory) or a quick climb (frequent garbage collection).

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Java Virtual Machine Memory.
The Java Virtual Machine Memory view appears in the display area.

This view shows the number of rulettes (rule instances) that are bound to specific object instances. This view is useful for understanding the environment complexity.

The Rulette and Topology view shows how many rules and rule instances are running. Many rulettes, especially as a function of the number of objects, can indicate that you are overloading your server or if some old rules are still running.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Objects - Rulette and Topology.
The Objects - Rulette and Topology view appears in the display area.

This view lists Foglight scripts with the script ID, script name, sum (ms), count, the difference between minimum and maximum invocation time, and the name of the cartridge in which the script is defined. A plot summary of the script invocation time also appears.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Script Invocation Time.
The Script Invocation Time view appears in the display area.

This view shows the Foglight Management Server load metrics and JVM performance.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Server Load.
The Server Load view appears in the display area.

This view highlights the data and metrics that are being processed in time or getting discarded.

The Service - Data & Message view shows details on data handling of the Foglight Management Server such as the number of skipped messages and the number of discarded metrics. The top-right embedded view shows the percentage of data that is dropped by the server over time, while the top-left embedded view shows the counts of total and skipped messages over time. A high percentage of dropped data can often indicate a server overload. The embedded view in the bottom right is useful for indicating how long data processing is expected to take. If that value grows over time, that is a good indication that the Foglight Management Server cannot keep up with the load from the agents.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Service - Data and Message.
The Service - Data and Message view appears in the display area.

The Service - Derivation and Query view shows activity in the derivation and query service such as the number of evaluations, rulettes, errors, and cache performance.

This view shows a mix of graphs that indicate the cost of metrics such as how many derived metrics are running in the Foglight Management Server, how many metric evaluations have occurred, and information on finding metrics in memory. Metrics are resource-demanding if there are a lot of derived metrics compared to the number of topology objects, or if the memory settings are such that no metric history is being kept in memory.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Service - Derivation and Query.
The Service - Derivation and Query view appears in the display area.

The Service - Persistence view shows metric details for the Foglight Management Server that is related to:

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Service - Persistence.
The Service - Persistence view appears in the display area.

This view shows the number of topology changes, skipped messages, and total messages. This view is useful for understanding the topology structure relating to agent activity.

The Service - Topology & Agent Manager is a two-part view.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select Service - Topology and Agent Manager.
The Service - Topology and Agent Manager view appears in the display area.

The UI Query Time view is similar to the Script Invocation Time view (see page 205) except that it shows tables for a query instead of a script.

This view shows a query table listing the query name, query ID, amount of time spent on invocation, count, and difference between minimal and maximal invocation time. A graph summarizing query invocation time also appears.

1
From the navigation panel, click Dashboards > Management Server > Diagnostic > Performance.
2
In the display area, click FMS Overview, and in the list that appears, select UI Query Time.
The UI Query Time view appears in the display area.

Some Foglight dashboards have reports associated with them. This allows you to run a report based on the current dashboard. You can generate the report using the Reports menu in the top-right corner.

The Performance Overview dashboard and Management Server View are associated with the Management Server Performance Summary Report. Run this report by choosing Management Server Performance Summary Report from the Reports menu, and specifying the input parameters in the report wizard.

The report wizard provides more information about the Management Server Performance Summary Report and instructions on how to set the input values. For more information about reports in Foglight, see the Foglight User Help.

Foglight Agent Manager Performance Overview

Explore the Foglight Agent Manager (FglAM) Overview view

The Overview view shows the numbers of remote hosts and Foglight agent instances that are connected to the Foglight Management Server. It also shows the maximal length of time spent by the Agent Manager (FglAM) on data polling.

Explore the Message Processing tab

The Message Processing tab shows tables for the number of pending messages and the number of incoming queue threads for a selected FglAM instance.

Explore the Clock Skew tab

The Clock Skew tab contains a graph that displays the upstream difference per second for a selected FglAM instance.

Explore the Bandwidth tab

The Bandwidth tab displays metrics for bandwidth usage samples taken at prescribed intervals per second for a selected FglAM instance, including the bytes in, bytes out, and real request time for a selected servlet. The bandwidth statistics reflect the bandwidth (bytes per second) used by the FglAM instance data over a specific time interval.

Explore the Misbehaving Clients tab

The Misbehaving Clients tab displays the disconnections per count for a selected FglAM instance.

Explore the XML Serialization tab

The XML Serialization tab shows tables of the serialization rate and time for the message serialization to and from XML for a selected FglAM instance.

The CPU tab displays the amount of time the CPU associated with a selected FglAM instance spends executing active processes and their number. For example, a sudden increase in CPU time may indicate that the user code is running inefficiently or a possible runaway process. Also, high CPU loads sometimes suggest that the host needs more CPU power to run efficiently.

The Memory Usage tab displays the amount of available memory and swap space for a selected FglAM instance. For example, a shortage of swap space often suggests a memory shortage, while a decline in the available memory may indicate a memory leaking process.

The CDT Submission tab displays information about the complexity of data that agents collect and submit for Canonical Data Transform (CDT) processing. Excessively large values or sudden increases in this data can result in performance problems.

The following metrics are displayed for each agent:

CDT Node Count: The number of internal data nodes produced by the CDT. Typically, there is one node for each topology object and its metrics, and one global (root) node in the tree.
CDT Value Count: The number of metrics and/or observations produced by the CDT.
Max Stack Depth: The depth of the data tree structure submitted by each agent instance. When a topology object in the data submission refers to another topology object, that increases the depth by one. When the second object refers to a third, the depth is increased again.
Node Count: The number of nodes in the submission. It is a measure of how large the data submission is.
Pre-processing time: The Agent Manager makes two passes over the data submitted by an agent. This is the time spent on the first pass, when the Agent Manager fills in references, validates the submission, calculates missing timestamps, and performs other pre-processing tasks.
Processing time: The length of time it takes the Agent Manager to transfer the data submission to the CDT processing engine of the Management Server.

Backing Up and Restoring Foglight

The following table shows the possible ways of backing up Foglight, some of which include the backup of the file system, and in some cases the system registry (on Windows). Each option shows a sequence of actions that can be performed to back up Foglight.

Issue a mysqldump command to export the MySQL database.

Alternatively, use the InnoDB HotBackup tool to back up the embedded MySQL database.
Issue a mysqldump command to export the MySQL database to a remote drive or a backup tape.
TIP: If you want to restore the database to a non-embedded PostgreSQL server, see the “Foglight Two Tier” section followed in this table.
Issue a mysqldump command to export the MySQL database to a remote drive or a backup tape.
Alternatively, use the InnoDB HotBackup tool to back up the embedded MySQL database.
Issue a mysqldump command to export the MySQL database.
Issue a pg_dump command to export the PostgreSQL database.
The default password is “foglight” that was set during the installation. The database information can be found in the server.database.* settings under <Foglight_home>/config/server.config.
Issue a mysqldump command to export the MySQL database.
Issue a pg_dump command to export the PostgreSQL database.
The default password is “foglight” that was set during the installation. The database information can be found in the server.database.* settings under <Foglight_home>/config/server.config.

The procedures below contain detailed information on how to back up the Foglight installation directory and the database, without backing up the file system or the system registry (on Windows).

1
Select Stop Foglight from the Start menu to shut down the Foglight Management Server.
a
Press CTRL + ALT + DELETE on your keyboard, then click Task Manager.
The Windows Task Manager opens.
b
Select the Processes tab to inspect the list of processes running on your system.
If the fms.exe process is not running, the Foglight Management Server is stopped.

External

To back up an MS SQL database used by the Foglight Management Server:

External

To back up a MySQL database using MySQL commands:

Internal

To back up a MySQL database using MySQL commands:

or

To back up an embedded MySQL database using the InnoDB Hot Backup tool:

External

To back up an Oracle database used by the Foglight Management Server:

External

Backup and Restore

1
Shut down the Foglight Management Server. In a Unix terminal window (for example, xterm) go to the <installation_dir>/bin directory, then type the following command:

External

To back up an MS SQL database used by the Foglight Management Server:

External

To back up a MySQL database using MySQL commands:

Internal

To back up a MySQL database using MySQL commands:

or

To back up an embedded MySQL database using the InnoDB Hot Backup tool:

External

To back up an Oracle database used by the Foglight Management Server:

External

Backup and Restore

1
cd to the directory one level above the Foglight installation directory.
NOTE: The archive must include the config, cartridge, support, licence, and scripts directories and all their content.
A tar.gz file is created in the current directory.
A Foglight.zip file appears in the current directory.
2
Start the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio (Start > All Programs > Microsoft SQL Server 2005 > SQL Server Management Studio).
a
In the Connect to Server dialog box, use the following settings:
Server type: Ensure that Database Engine is selected.
Server name: Ensure that this option is set to the name of the computer on which the MS SQL server is installed.
Authentication: Select the authentication method that you want to use for connecting to the database server. You can use your Windows user account (Windows Authentication) or a SQL server account obtained from your database administrator (SQL Server Authentication), as required. The available authentication modes are set at installation time. For more information, see your database administrator, or refer to the MS SQL Server documentation.
SQL Server Authentication only. User name: Type your SQL Server user name.
SQL Server Authentication only. Password: Type your SQL Server user password.
b
In the Connect to Server dialog box, click Connect.
Upon a successful connection to the MS SQL Server, the Connect to Server dialog box closes, and the Object Explorer pane in the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio window refreshes, showing the objects related to the database server to which you connected.
In the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio window, in the Object Explorer pane, expand the Databases node.
Below the Databases node, a set of sub-nodes appear, including a node for system databases, database snapshots, the foglight database node, along with any other databases that exist in your environment, if applicable.
TIP: The Foglight database, represented by the foglight node in the Object Explorer tree, is installed on the MS SQL Server during the Foglight Management Server installation. For additional information, see the Installation and Setup Guide set.
a
In the Object Explorer pane, right-click the foglight node and from the cascading menus that appear, select Tasks > Backup.
b
Review the backup settings in the Backup Up Database—foglight dialog box, and if required, make additional modifications.
For example, to change the location of the backup file, under Destinations, click Add, and select a desired location.
TIP: The Backup Up Database—foglight dialog box includes two pages, each showing a different collection of settings: General and Options. By default, the General page is selected.
To switch between the General and Options pages, select the appropriate page in the Select a page pane in the upper-left.
d
In the Backup Up Database—foglight dialog box, click OK.
The MS SQL backup command creates a backup file of the Foglight database. After a few moments, the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio message box appears, indicating that the backup of the MS SQL database is complete.
6
In the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio message box, click OK to close it.
The Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio message box and Backup Up Database—foglight dialog box close.
2
Ensure that PATH and LD_LIBRARY_PATH & ORACLE_HOME are all set correctly.
On Windows® systems:
a
Open a Windows® Explorer window, and right-click on My Computer.
b
Select Properties.
c
Click the Advanced tab and click Environment Variables.
d
Visually inspect the values associated with the PATH and LD_LIBRARY_PATH & ORACLE_HOME variables.
A dbdump file is created.
database_user is the name of the database user, as configured by the foglight.database.user parameter in <Foglight_home>/config/server.config.
database_port_number is the database port number, as configured by the foglight.database.port parameter in <Foglight_home>/config/server.config.
database_hostname_or_ip is the name of the computer on which the database is installed, or its IP address, as configured by the foglight.database.host parameter in <Foglight_home>/config/server.config.
database_name is the database name, as configured by the foglight.database.name parameter in <Foglight_home>/config/server.config.
--routines is a flag that ensures that all functions are included in the backup.
backupfile_name is the name of the backup SQL file.
3
After the backup SQL file is created, stop the MySQL database by issuing the shutdownDb.bat command from the <Foglight_home>/bin directory.
4
Verify that the database is down by verifying that the database process, mysqld.exe, is no longer running using the Task Manager.
Where Foglight_home contains the path to the Foglight installation directory. For example, its default location on Windows is C:\Quest\Foglight.
datadir="Foglight_home/mysql/data"
innodb_data_home_dir="Foglight_home/mysql/data"
innodb_data_file_path=ibdata1:10M:autoextend
innodb_log_group_home_dir="Foglight_home/mysql/data"
set-variable=innodb_log_files_in_group=2
set-variable=innodb_log_file_size=64
datadir="path_to_backup_data"
innodb_data_home_dir="path_to_backup_data"
innodb_data_file_path=ibdata1:10M:autoextend
innodb_log_group_home_dir="path_to_backup_data"
set-variable=innodb_log_files_in_group=2
set-variable=innodb_log_file_size=64
Foglight_home contains the path to the Foglight installation directory.
path_to_backup_data contains the path to the directory that is to contain the backup files, as defined in Step 1.
For example, C:\Quest\Foglight\backup\data (Windows).
When you are done, save the files in the config directory that you have created in Step 1.
NOTE: The above example illustrates the process of backing up a MySQL database on Windows, which uses the back slash character as a directory separator and the dir command to list files. On Unix platforms, use the forward slash to separate directories and the list -l command.
The backup directory contains one data file, ibdata1, and a log file, ibbackup_logfile. The backup process copies different database pages at different times. The log file, ibbackup_logfile, specifies the order in which the pages are backed up. Applying the log file to the backup data associates each database page with a sequence in the log file, and creates one or more log files for each data file, allowing you to successfully restore the database from the backup data when required.
C:\Quest\Foglight\mysql\bin>ibbackup --apply-log
NOTE: The example bellow illustrates the process of backing up a MySQL database on Windows, which uses the back slash character as a directory separator and the dir command to list files. On Unix platforms, use the forward slash to separate directories and the list -l command.
10/24/2008 10:55 AM 10,485,760 ibdata1
In addition to the files ibbackup_logfile and ibdata1 that were created at backup time (see Step 5), the backup directory now includes two additional log files, ib_logfile0 and ib_logfile1, which means that the logs have been applied successfully.

“Restoring” a physical backup means reconstructing it and making it available to users. This section outlines how to restore an old Foglight installation. The process is similar for Windows and Unix systems.

External

MS SQL commands

To restore an MS SQL database from the database export file:

External

MySQL commands

To restore a MySQL database from the database export file:

Internal

MySQL commands

To restore a MySQL database from the database export file:

Internal

InnoDB Hot Backup

To restore an embedded MySQL database previously backed up using the InnoDB tools:

External

Oracle tools

To restore an Oracle database from the database export file:

Internal

Zip tools

To restore the previous Foglight installation directory:

Internal

Zip tools

To restore the previous Foglight installation directory:

External

PostgreSQL commands

To restore a PostgreSQL database on Windows from the database export file:

External

PostgreSQL commands

To restore a PostgreSQL database on Unix from the database export file:

You can do that by choosing Start > All Programs > Microsoft SQL Server 2005 > SQL Server Management Studio.
a
In the Connect to Server dialog box, use the following settings:
Server type: Ensure that Database Engine is selected.
Server name: Ensure that this option is set to the name of the computer on which the MS SQL server is installed.
Authentication: Select the authentication method that you want to use for connecting to the database server. You can use your Windows user account (Windows Authentication) or a SQL server account obtained from your database administrator (SQL Server Authentication), as required. The available authentication modes are set at installation time. For more information, see your database administrator, or refer to the MS SQL Server documentation.
SQL Server Authentication only. User name: Type your SQL Server user name.
SQL Server Authentication only. Password: Type your SQL Server user password.
b
In the Connect to Server dialog box, click Connect.
Upon a successful connection to the MS SQL Server, the Connect to Server dialog box closes, and the Object Explorer pane in the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio window refreshes, showing the objects related to the database server to which you connected.
In the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio window, in the Object Explorer pane, expand the Databases node.
Below the Databases node, a set of sub-nodes appear, including a node for system databases, database snapshots, the foglight database node, along with any other databases that exist in your environment, if applicable.
TIP: The Foglight database, represented by the foglight node in the Object Explorer tree, is installed on the MS SQL Server during the Foglight Management Server installation. For additional information, see the Installation and Setup Guide set.
a
In the Object Explorer pane, right-click the foglight node and from the menu that appears, choose Delete.
b
Review the backup settings in the Delete Object dialog box, and if required, make additional modifications.
c
In the Delete Object dialog box, click OK.
After a few moments, the Delete Object dialog box closes, indicating a success. Additionally, in the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio window, in the Object Explorer pane, the Databases node refreshes, no longer showing the foglight node.
a
In the Object Explorer pane, right-click the Databases node and from the menu that appears, choose Restore Database.
The Restore Database dialog box includes two pages, each showing a different collection of settings: General and Options. On its appearance, the dialog box shows the General page. To switch between the General and Options pages, select the appropriate page in the Select a page pane in the upper-left.
b
In the Restore Database dialog box, ensure that the General page is selected.
In the Restore Database dialog box, in the General page, under Destination for restore, in the To database box, type foglight.
TIP: The default location and name of this file is C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL.1\MSSQL\Backup\foglight.bak.
In the Restore Database dialog box, in the General page, under Source for restore, select From device and click the browse button on the right .
In the Specify Backup dialog box, click Add. In the Locate Backup File dialog box that appears, select the backup file, followed by clicking OK.
The Locate Backup File dialog box closes and the Specify Backup dialog box refreshes, showing the name and location of the selected backup file.
e
Click OK to close the Specify Backup dialog box.
The Restore Database dialog box refreshes, indicating that a backup file is selected.
In the Restore Database dialog box, in the General page, under Source for restore, in the Select the backup sets to restore table, in the row containing the backup set, select the check box in the Restore column.
g
Review the remaining settings in the Restore Database dialog box, and if required, make additional modifications.
h
In the Restore Database dialog box, click OK.
The MS SQL restore command restores the Foglight database from the selected backup file. After a few moments, the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio message box appears, indicating that the restore of the MS SQL database is complete.
7
In the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio message box, click OK to close it.
The Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio message box and Backup Up Database—foglight dialog box close. Additionally, in the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio window, in the Object Explorer pane, the foglight node appears under Databases.
3
After running mysql -u root, execute the following SQL statement:
4
After running mysql -u root, run the SQL script created by the backup. Use the following syntax:
SOURCE <path to sql file>
Locate the oracle_drop_db.sql script in the scripts/sql directory of the server installation, and then start the script from the command line using the following syntax:
sqlplus <dbadmin_usr>/<dbadmin_pwd>@<ORACLE_SID>
NOTE: The files oracle_drop_dp.sql and oracle_drop_db.sql are included with Foglight when you use an Oracle database, The files are located in the
<Foglight_home>/scripts/sql directory.
Issue the drop user command using the following syntax:
NOTE: The dbdump file is the backup file you must create in order to restore your Oracle database (see To back up an Oracle database used by the Foglight Management Server:).
TIP: Change the pg_hba.conf file to ensure that authentication method is password, if needed. For more information about PostgreSQL connections and authentication, see Connections and Authentication.
6
Restore the database on the desired PostgreSQL database host using the following sample command.
7
Update the server.database.* settings under <folight_home_path>/config/server.config, in order to set up the connection between the Foglight server and the new database.
TIP: Change the pg_hba.conf file to ensure that authentication method is password, if needed. For more information about PostgreSQL connections and authentication, see Connections and Authentication.
7
Update the server.database.* settings under <folight_home_path>/config/server.config, in order to set up the connection between the Foglight server and the new database.
1
From the command-line, change directories (cd) to the directory where you want to install Foglight.
cd <installation_dir>/bin
For more information about command-line options, see the Foglight Command-Line Reference Guide.

The previous Foglight installation is now restored.

2
Copy the backup data that was created with the InnoDB tool, including the data files and the log files, to the directory <Foglight_home>/mysql/data. The backup data and log files use the following naming convention:
ibdata<1-n>. The name of the first data file is ibdata1, of the second ibdata2, and so on. The number of data files depends on the size of the backed up database.
ib_logfile<0-n>. The name of the first log file is ib_logfile0, of the second ib_logfile1, and so on. The number of log files depends on the size of the backed up database and the size of the log file specified in the backup configuration file, backup.cnf.

In some cases it may be required to move the Foglight Management Server to different hardware. This may result in a change to the Management Server host name, IP address, or both, while the database may or may not move.

If the host name changes, you must obtain a new Foglight license.To receive a new license, send an email to license@quest.com with your contact and site ID information, along with an explanation of why you need a license. Changing only the IP address, while the host name remains the same, does not require a license update.

If the host name changes, you must also update the CATALYST_URL registry variable. This registry variable contains the Management Server host name and port, which are used to build the alarm URLs sent in email message alerts. For more information about email settings, see Explore the Mail (Global Settings) view.

This sectiontopic describes the process of moving the Foglight Management Server to a different computer.

If the database is still running, use the shutdownDB command to shut down the database. For more information about this command, see the Command-Line Reference Guide.
2
Back up the <Foglight_home> directory.
3
Restore the backed up <Foglight_home> directory to the desired location on the new target machine.
From <Foglight_home>/bin, issue the fms command.
From <Foglight_home>/bin, issue the ./fms command
5
Host name changes only — Obtain a new license file and install it using the browser interface.
To receive a new license file, send an email to license@quest.com with your contact and site ID information, along with an explanation of why you need a license
Log files are located in <Foglight_home>/logs.
If the database is still running, use the shutdownDB command to shut down the database. For more information about this command, see the Command-Line Reference Guide.
2
Back up the <Foglight_home> directory.
3
Restore the backed up <Foglight_home> directory to a desired location on the new target machine.
From <Foglight_home>\bin, issue the following command:
5
Host name changes only. Obtain a new license file and install it using the browser interface.
To obtain a new license file, send an email to license@quest.com with your contact and site ID information, along with an explanation of why you need a license.
From <Foglight_home>\bin, issue the following command:

If you have other configuration changes in your environment that are related to this change, you may need to perform additional configuration steps. Those changes can include:

For more information on how to implement these configuration changes, visit the Support Portal at https://support.quest.com/.

 

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