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Foglight Agent Manager 5.8.5.7 - Foglight Agent Manager Guide

Configuring the embedded Agent Manager Installing external Agent Managers
Understanding how the Agent Manager communicates with the Management Server Deploying the Agent Manager cartridge Downloading the Agent Manager installer Installing the Agent Manager Starting or stopping the Agent Manager process Frequently asked questions
Configuring the Agent Manager Advanced system configuration and troubleshooting
Configuring Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) Configuring Windows Remote Management (WinRM) UNIX- and Linux-specific configuration
Monitoring the Agent Manager performance Deploying the Agent Manager to large-scale environments

Configuring the Agent Manager to accept connections from the Management Server

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Configuring the Agent Manager : Configuring the Agent Manager to accept connections from the Management Server

You can configure the Foglight Agent Manager to accept connections from the Management Server and enable reverse data polling. This is useful in situations when the Agent Manager cannot connect to the Management Server due to its location. For example, when the Agent Manager is located in the cloud and the Management Server runs on premises, the Agent Manager has no means to connect to the Management Server and pass on the collected data. Another example is when the Agent Manager resides in a demilitarized zone (DMZ), exposed to untrusted networks, and the Management Server is behind a firewall.
Using the fglam.config.xml file, disable upstream connections to the Management Server. For instructions, see To prevent the Agent Manager from connecting to the Management Server:.
1
Open the fglam.config.xml file for editing. This file is located in the <fglam_home>/state/default/config directory.
2
In the fglam.config.xml file, locate the <config:http-upstreams> XML element, and within that element, declare a new <config:http-upstream> element using the following lines of code:
The no-connection element prevents the Agent Manager from connecting to the upstream Management Server.
1
Open the fglam.config.xml file for editing. This file is located in the <fglam_home>/state/default/config directory.
2
In the fglam.config.xml file, locate the <config:http-downstreams> XML element, and within that element, declare a new <config:http-downstream> sub-element for a non-SSL connection or <config:https-downstream> for an SSL connection.
3
Non-SSL connections only. Within the newly created <config:http-downstream> element, provide a port number that the Agent Manager will use to listen for incoming connections, and optionally the IP address of the network interface. For example:
4
User-provided certificates or keystores only. Within the newly created <config:https-downstream> element, provide the information about the certificate and keystore you want to use. There is a wide range of attributes that you can use. For complete instructions, review the <config:documentation> element under <config:http-downstreams>.
2
On the Agent Properties dashboard, under Agent Type, select FglAM Adapter, and in the pane on the right, click Edit.
3
In the Agent Type Properties dialog box that appears, under Hosts to Pull Data From, click Edit.
4
In the Edit List of Hosts to Pull Data From dialog box that appears, click Add.
Enabled: Select this check box if you want the Management Server to connect to this Agent Manager.
URL: Type the URL the Agent Manager uses to communicate with the Management Server.
Local Address: To specify a local network address for the Management Server connection to the Agent Manager, type the IP address of a NIC (network interface card) on the machine hosting the Agent Manager required to establish connections to the Management Server.
Proxy URL: If you want the Agent Manager to connect to the Management Server using a proxy, type the URL of the proxy server.
Proxy NTLM Domain: If you are using a proxy server for communication, and the proxy uses Windows authentication, type the Windows domain.
Proxy User Name: If you are using a proxy server for communication, type the user name needed to access the proxy server.
Proxy Password: If you are using a proxy server for communication, type the password associated with the user name.
Allow Self Signed SSL Certificates: Select this check box if you want to enable the Agent Manager to accept self-signed certificates from the Management Server.
SSL Certificate Common Name: If you want to enable the Agent Manager to accept self-signed certificates from the Management Server, and the certificate has a different common (host) name than the one reported by the Management Server, type the certificate common name.
Compressed Connection: Select this check box if you want the Agent Manager to establish HTTP-compressed communication with the Management Server.
Chunked HTTP Connection: Select this check box if you want to use an HTTP connection with chunked transfer encoding enabled.

Configuring multiple Agent Manager instances

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Configuring the Agent Manager : Configuring multiple Agent Manager instances

The files related to the Agent Manager’s run-time state (for example, configuration and log files), are saved in the <fglam_home>/state/ directory tree. Under the state directory, there is a sub-directory for each available Agent Manager instance.
In this type of configuration, you create multiple instances and each instance uses a different state directory but runs from a single Agent Manager bin directory. One example of this type of configuration is to test new agent settings without making changes to the agents you are currently using to monitor your production environment.
You can also configure multiple physical installations of the Agent Manager to use a corresponding state directory that exists on a single shared drive. One example use of this functionality is running the Agent Manager in cluster environments. See Example: Running multiple instances in a cluster environment for more information.
As described below, you create a new instance (and its associated state sub-directory) by including the --create-state and --location "<state_name>" (or -l "<state_name>") options with the fglam command; you then use the fglam ‑‑location "<state_name>" command to run that new instance.
IMPORTANT: On UNIX® platforms, the entire Agent Manager installation — including all state directories — must be owned by the same system user.
Where <state_name> is the name of the new instance.
A new state directory is created in <fglam_home>/state/<state_name>.
Where <state_name> is the same instance name you specified above.

Example: Running multiple instances in a cluster environment

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Configuring the Agent Manager : Configuring multiple Agent Manager instances : Example: Running multiple instances in a cluster environment

When the Agent Manager installation is available to the nodes in the cluster, the next step is to initialize a state directory for an instance on the shared drive that is used by the cluster. When setting the state location locally from one of the nodes, you must define the full path to the remotely-mounted state directory.
In the following example, <state_dir> is a path to a state directory on a shared network server that is accessible locally from all machines. For example: on Windows clients, the <state_dir> can be f:\cluster_shared_dir\fglam_states\STATENAME_A, while on UNIX® clients, it is /mnt/cluster_shared_dir/fglam_states/STATENAME_A.
Ensure that only one instance of the Agent Manager that uses a particular state directory is running at a time. Do not run two instances of the Agent Manager on separate machines (or separate active nodes in the cluster) and cause these instances to use the same shared state directory simultaneously.

Controlling the polling rate

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Configuring the Agent Manager : Controlling the polling rate

Minimum Polling Interval (seconds): The minimum polling interval, in seconds.
Maximum Polling Interval (seconds): The maximum polling interval, in seconds.
Polling Timeout (seconds): A time-out/grace period (in seconds) that the FglAMAdapter waits for a host to respond, before considering it as disconnected. This is used to account for clock skews and changes in timing typically seen on heavily loaded VMware images.
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