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NetVault Bare Metal Recovery 12.0 - User Guide for Plug-ins

Introducing NetVault Bare Metal Recovery Plug-ins Deploying NetVault Bare Metal Recovery Using the Plug-in Offline Client
Plug-in Server: an overview Installing and removing Plug-in Server Configuring Plug-in Server for use with Plug-in Offline Client Booting a NetVault Bare Metal Recovery Client with Plug-in Offline Client Backing up data with Plug-in Offline Client Restoring data with Plug-in Offline Client
Using NetVault Bare Metal Recovery Plug-in Live Client for Windows
Plug-in Live Client for Windows: an overview Configuring Plug-in Server for use with Plug-in Live Client for Windows Installing and removing Plug-in Live Client for Windows Backing up data with Plug-in Live Client for Windows Booting a NetVault Bare Metal Recovery Client with Plug-in Offline Client Restoring data with Plug-in Live Client for Windows
Using NetVault Bare Metal Recovery Plug-in Live Client for Linux
Plug-in Live Client for Linux: an overview Installing and removing Plug-in Live Client for Linux Generating a DR image for use with Plug-in Live Client for Linux Creating the required bootable CD for use with Plug-in Live Client for Linux Recovering a DR image for use with Plug-in Live Client for Linux
NetVault Bare Metal Recovery physical-to-virtual (P2V) recovery Troubleshooting

Excluding LUNs from the NetVault Backup Selections pages

In some instances of using the Windows PE-based Plug-in Offline Client, the logical unit numbers (LUNs) of a Fibre Channel card are identified as drives by the Windows Disk Manager. As a result, NetVault Backup might also interpret the LUNs as drives, display them on the NetVault Backup Selections page, and attempt to include them in a backup job if they are selected. The VSS Backup job then fails because of this issue. To work around this issue, you can edit the “nvdrw.cfg” file to prevent the LUNs from appear on the NetVault Backup Selections page.

To update the file, perform the following steps.

1
Locate and open the “nvdrw.cfg” file in a text editor.
For the Plug-in Offline Client, this file is located in \\Windows\System32\. For the Plug-in Live Client, this file is located in \\NetVault Backup\config\. If the file does not exist, you can create it.
b
In the Windows Task Manager screen, select the Processes tab, right-click drdaemon, select End Process, and close the Task Manager.
c
To restart the drdaemon, type the following at a command prompt; if necessary, click Launch CMD again; and press Enter:
5
For the Plug-in Live Client, access the Windows Task Manager on the NetVault Bare Metal Recovery Client, select the Processes tab, right-click nvdrw, select End Process, and close the Task Manager.
6
Access the NetVault Backup Selections page of the NetVault Backup Backup window, and verify that the changes are reflected.

Performing a restore in which Disk Numbers are different from the backup

In some instances, the Disk Number assigned to a drive during backup might be different for the restore. To work around this issue, note the Disk ID and disk order displayed on the Create Selection Set page, use the Plug-in Offline Client to boot the machine that is targeted for the restore, and then note whether the disk order is different. If the order is different, use the Rename option during the restore process to prevent data loss.

To determine whether the disk order is different, perform the following steps.

2
On the Create Restore Job — Choose Saveset page, select Plug-in Server from the Plugin Type list.

Access denied during MBR recovery

During recovery of a Master Boot Record (MBR), if you receive an error message that indicates access was denied because a filesystem is still mounted, you must manually unmount the filesystem and complete the recovery process again.

Restoring a saveset creates a filesystem with default parameters

If you customize parameters for a filesystem that is backed up using Plug-in Live Client for Linux, the parameters are not retained during the restore process. Instead, the system is restored and set to use the default parameters. For example, if you use performance tuning to set the mode to journal_data_writeback, the restored system uses the default setting, journal_data_ordered

To work around this issue, use one of the following approaches:

Update the “/etc/fstab” file to reflect the customized parameters before backing up the system. This ensures that the restored system retains the customized parameters.
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