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NetVault Backup Plug-in for Oracle 11.3 - User Guide

Introducing Quest® NetVault® Backup Plug-in  for Oracle Defining a backup strategy Installing and removing the plug-in Configuring the plug-in Backing up data Using the Oracle® Flashback Database Restoring data
Restoring and recovering data: an overview Performing User Managed restores Using advanced User Managed restore procedures Performing RMAN restores Using RMAN types of recovery in a non-RAC environment Using advanced procedures with RMAN restores
Maintaining the Recovery Catalog Using the RMAN CLI Using the Plug-in with Oracle® RAC Using the Plug-in in a failover cluster environment Using the plug-in with Oracle® Data Guard Troubleshooting

Determining the Oracle SID and Home directory in a non-RAC environment

To identify the Oracle® system ID (SID) and home directory, use one of the following procedures, based on the OS running on the Oracle Database Server.

Windows

On Windows®, the SID and Oracle® Home can be determined from the Registry.

1
Start the Registry Editor on the Oracle Database Server.
a
On the taskbar, click Start, and then click Run.
b
On the Run dialog box, type regedit, and then click OK.
Various directories are displayed. Each folder prefaced with “KEY_” represents an installation of Oracle on the target machine, if multiple installations of Oracle exist on the machine.
3
Open the folder entitled “KEY_<Oracle_Home>” that represents the target installation of Oracle to list the registry items in the frame on the right.
4
In the Name column, locate the following items, and make note of the associated entry in the Data column:

Linux and UNIX

On Linux® and UNIX®, you can use the “oratab” file to identify the SID and Oracle® Home.

1
Open the “oratab” file by issuing the following command in a terminal window:
2
In the “oratab” file, note the application information.
<ORACLE_SID>:<ORACLE_HOME>:<Additional Information>
For example, if “oratab” contains the following:
“PROD” is the ORACLE_SID

Creating the RMAN repository

As discussed in Choosing the location for the RMAN repository, for an RMAN backup strategy you must first choose a location for the RMAN repository. By default, this repository is maintained in the Control File. However, for larger or more mission-critical databases, create a Recovery Catalog database that can store a much longer history than the Control File.

Creating a Recovery Catalog is a three-step process: configure the database that will contain the Recovery Catalog, create the Recovery Catalog owner, and then create the Recovery Catalog itself.

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