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SQL Navigator for Oracle 7.4 - User Guide

Quick Overview Working With SQL Navigator Navigation Oracle Logon Code Editor Visual Object Editors Team Coding and Version Control Systems Modules, Windows And Dialogs
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View Editor

Visual Object Editors > View Editor

Use the View Editor to view, create, or alter views.

About Views

A view is a query that is named in the database so that it can be used as if it were a table. It can be thought of as a virtual table in the database whose contents are defined by the Select query.

You can use views to rearrange, filter and select the way you see data in tables without creating any copies of that data. Views help make data access simpler by hiding complexities. They can also help separate data for different users as a security measure.

SQL Navigator’s view editor makes it easy to create and alter views. Although you won’t need to type any PL/SQL code when editing views in SQL Navigator, you should be familiar with Oracle rules and guidelines for using views.

The attributes of this database object are described in Oracle documentation.

 

Using The Editor

Editor Toolbar

Icon Tool Tip Description
Create new view Click to open the New View dialog.
Open object from DB Open an existing view.
Clone current view Create a clone of the selected view. You will be prompted in the New View dialog to enter a new name.
Revert to pervious view Undo or revert any modifications made to the view.
Generate SQL for changes Generate SQL code for the changes made.
Apply changes to DB Apply changes to the database.

Editor Tabs

Tab Description

Text

Field Description

Create View (

Enter the view column names, separated by commas.

) AS

Type the SQL for the view.

If you enter the Select * syntax to include all the table columns in the view, then all the table column names from the Select * table appear automatically in the CREATE VIEW pane.

Columns

  1. Select a column.
  2. Right click and select Edit Comments
  3. Enter any comments required.
  4. Repeat for each column as appropriate.

Options

Select from the available options to be applied to the view.

Comment

Enter any comments related to the view.

 

Ways to Open The View Editor

Icon Action Description

From the Main Menu

View Menu | Visual Object Editors | View Editor

Open the View Editor.

From DB Navigator or Find objects Dialog

Right click on a View object and click Open.

Open the selected object in the View Editor.

Java Editor

Visual Object Editors > Java Editor

Features:

  • Load a Java source file from the database into the editor
  • Create a new Java source file
  • Clone an existing Java source
  • View and edit Java source with color syntax highlighting
  • Compile the Java object
  • Save the Java class to the database.

To see tooltips describing the toolbar buttons, simply point to them.

Ways to open the Java Editor

Icon Action Description

From the Main Menu

View Menu | Visual Object Editors | Java Editor

Open the Java Editor with a new Java source.

From DB Navigator or Find objects Dialog

Right click on a Java Source object and click Open.

Open the selected Java Source object in the Java Editor.

Instance Property Editor

Visual Object Editors > Instance Property Editor

Use the Instance Property Editor to view or specify the startup parameters for the instance.

About Instance Properties

The characteristics of the Oracle database instance are specified during startup. These parameters are stored in a file called init.ora. This file may, in turn, call a corresponding config.ora file.

The Instance Property Editor is based on what the Oracle v$parameter data dictionary view reports. Some attributes are Session Modifiable, which means that they are applied immediately to the current session, but are not permanent. Others are System Modifiable and further may be Immediate or Deferred (requiring a server shutdown/restart). Some are not modifiable at all.

These parameters and the rules governing their usage are described in Oracle reference sources.

 

Using The Editor

Instance Property

Select the Instance Property you want to view. Not all properties can be modified.

Icon Description
The Property can be modified.
The Property cannot be modified.

Editor Toolbar

Icon Tool Tip Description
Create new Instance property N/A to the Instance Property Editor. Oracle does not allow this action.
Open object from DB Open the property from the current database
Clone current Instance property N/A to the Instance Property Editor. Oracle does not allow this action.
Revert to pervious Instance property Undo changes made to the property.
Generate SQL for changes Generate SQL code for the changes made
Apply changes to DB Apply the changes to the database

Details Tab

Attribute Description
Description Brief description of the parameter
Is Default Whether this parameter has been specified by the user as an initialization parameter
System Modifiable Whether this parameter can be modified at an instance-wide level dynamically after the instance has started
Session Modifiable Whether this parameter can be modified at the session level
Is Modified Whether this parameter has been modified after instance startup, and if so, whether it was modified at the session level or at the instance (system) level
Is Adjusted Whether Oracle has adjusted a value specified by the user
Type The Oracle datatype
Value Current value for this session (if modified within the session); otherwise, the instance-wide value
Alter For Whether the new value is to be current for this session or instance-wide

 

Ways to Open The Instance Property Editor

Icon Action Description

From the Main Menu

View Menu | Visual Object Editors | Instance Property Editor

Open the Instance Property Editor.

From DB Navigator

Right click on a Property object and click Open.

Open the selected object in the Instance Property Editor.

Team Coding and Version Control Systems

Team Coding and Version Control Support

Team Coding controls database objects and source files, such as procedures and functions. Team Coding enables you to organize code work among different projects and control access to the code objects by locking them in the database. You can use Team Coding alone or in conjunction with a version control system (VCS).

Use Team Coding with a VCS

Used with a VCS, Team Coding provides full source control with locking and full revision history. Team Coding interfaces directly with the VCS to provide this control. Team Coding keeps track of changes to objects and prevents modifications to the code in the database unless a SQL Navigator user checks the source out of the VCS through Team Coding. Team Coding with a VCS works as follows:

  • When the SQL Navigator user issues a check-out command, SQL Navigator checks a revision out of the VCS and saves the code to the local SQL Navigator environment.
  • When the SQL Navigator user saves the code, SQL Navigator writes it to the database.
  • When the SQL Navigator user issues a check-in command, SQL Navigator checks the revision into the VCS.

The Team Coding Administrator creates one or more Team Projects and associates them with projects in the VCS. For more information, see Setup Team Projects.

Use Team Coding without a VCS

Used without a VCS, Team Coding works as follows:

  • Administrators must protect production schemas by creating one or more Team Projects, which are the only way that developers can check objects in and out of the database and work on them. This allows the developers to work on the objects in their local environments without affecting the original objects.
  • When a developer checks out an object through a Team Coding Project, SQL Navigator locks the object in the database. This prevents the developer from unintentionally overwriting changes made to that object by other developers. The developer checks the finished code into the database through the Team Project, which unlocks the object again. For more information, see Check in and Check out.
  • Team Coding without a VCS does not provide revision history as a VCS would. The source code is maintained in the database, with no other versions available (other than through your own normal backup methods). SQL Navigator does provide one "undo" option, which is to undo the check-in. For more information, see Team Coding Manager.

Work with non-controlled objects

When Team Coding is installed with a VCS, you also have full edit access to objects in the VCS that are not controlled in Team Coding. This access is controlled from the Team Coding Manager. You can check those objects into and out of the VCS to work on them in the Code Editor. The Team Coding Manager shows you which objects are under the control of Team Coding (and therefore must be accessed through a Team Project) and which can be accessed directly from the VCS.

Install Team Coding

Administer Team Coding

Objects Supported by Team Coding

Version Control Systems

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