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Unified Communications Diagnostics 8.4.1 - User Guide

About Unified Communications Diagnostics Getting Started Using the Management Console Introducing Management Console health tests Health tests available from the Exchange organization node
About the Exchange-based health tests Exchange Server Health Test Prerequisites for Exchange Delivery Health Tests Exchange Internal Server Delivery Health Test Exchange Internal Mailbox Delivery Health Test Exchange External Message Delivery Health Test Exchange Modern Message Delivery Health Test Exchange Storage Health Test Exchange Queue Health Test Internal Outlook Web Access (OWA) Availability Health Test External Outlook Web Access (OWA) Availability Health Test Exchange Replication Health Test Exchange System Health Test Active Directory Account Lockout Health Test Exchange Online Connectivity Health Test Exchange Online Mailbox Logon Health Test Exchange Online Message Delivery Health Test Office 365 Subscription Health Test BlackBerry Server Health Test BlackBerry Message Delivery Health Test Creating test mailboxes for Exchange Adding health sets for Exchange System health tests Configuring Exchange impersonation for the Modern Message Delivery health test
Health tests available from the Lync/Skype for Business Environment Resolving Problems with Native Tools Launching the Diagnostic Console from the Management Console Launching UC Analytics from the Management Console Diagnosing Problems using the Diagnostic Console UC Diagnostics: Exchange 2007 Diagnostic Console (Plug In) UC Diagnostics: Exchange 2010 Diagnostic Console (Plug In) UC Diagnostics: Exchange 2013 Diagnostic Console (Plug In) UC Diagnostics: Exchange 2016 Diagnostic Console (Plug In) UC Diagnostics: BlackBerry Diagnostic Console (Plug In) UC Diagnostics: OCS Diagnostic Console (Plug In) UC Diagnostics: Lync 2013 or Skype for Business 2015 Diagnostic Console (Plug In) Reporting Using Web Reports Counters with Non-Zero Alarm Values

Editing Individual server thresholds while creating a health test

In the Edit Server Thresholds dialog, if no Server is shown, click the Browse button. In the Select Servers dialog, check the boxes for one or more servers, or group. Click OK to return.

Specify Error and/or Warning threshold values for the selected Server. If only one threshold is specified, the other threshold assumes the value shown in the Default counter thresholds, if present.

These values override the default threshold values for this server only, and only in this health test.You cannot leave this dialog with invalid threshold values specified.

In the health test creation wizard, up to 5 servers that have a server specific threshold defined are listed in the Overrides column for that counter. To view all servers with override values, right-click on the counter and select Edit Server Thresholds.

Editing counter thresholds in the test results pane

You can edit counter thresholds in the Test Results section without opening an associated health test wizard.

You can edit default error and warning thresholds that apply to all servers. You can also specify server-specific error and warning thresholds. These override the default values.

Counters with the same name may be defined on the same page of the Exchange Server Health test wizard. Both counters are required to define test conditions. Do not change the thresholds for either one of these counters in the Test Results area because both counters are changed which significantly alters test conditions and test results.

Counter thresholds at the time of test execution

indicates the default or server-specific counter threshold values set at the time the test was executed. These values cannot be changed.

Current default counter thresholds

indicates the threshold values for servers that do not have server-specific thresholds set

Current server-specific counter thresholds

indicates the threshold values for the current server, if applicable for the specific test type.

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Some counters are configured to use wildcards. If you edit the threshold of a particular counter (in Test Results) using one of the instances reported in test results, then the new threshold value is applied to all instances of the counter.

For example, if you create an Exchange Server Health Test, there is a performance counter called Network Interface\Packets Outbound Errors (<All instances>). When you view the test results, you will notice that there are two instances of Network Interface\Packets Outbound Errors that were monitored.

If you edit the threshold of one instance of this counter in the test results pane, then the threshold of the other instance of this counter is also changed.

This applies to performance counters only.

Setting data collection options

Data collection options can affect the server health test results that are returned for volumes, network availability, and services:

This section describes some of the configuration options that can be used to affect the Server Health tests:

For the Exchange System Health test, there is a data collection configuration option used to ignore warnings for target servers on which health sets are not installed. For information about health sets and the Exchange System Health test, see Exchange System Health Test .

WMI is used to retrieve accurate disk space information when using mount points. If you do not use mount points, you can configure your tests to use Windows API if WMI fails.

When you make this change in one server type, all other server types are changed for the test.

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Click Data collection options.
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Cick the Volumes tab and select Allow API fallback if WMI fails.
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The Server Health test always performs a reverse DNS lookup to validate that DNS server has a record that maps the IP address of the target server to the host name. By default, the reverse DNS lookup alarm is enabled. If you do not want the test to alarm if the names returned by a DNS lookup do not match the FQDN of the target server, you can disable this option.

When you make this change in one server type, all other server types are changed.

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Click Data collection options.
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Click the Network Availability tab and clear the Alarm on reverse DNS lookup check box.
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The Server Health test normally reports all warnings and errors that exceed their thresholds. However, you can ignore warnings for services that are not installed in the target server or warnings for services that are not configured to start automatically.

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Click Data collection options.
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Click the Services tab.

The Exchange System Health test monitors the health state for different groups of monitors, called health sets. If all a health set’s monitors are healthy, the health set is in a healthy state. If any monitor is not in a healthy state, the health set state is determined by its least healthy monitor.

If health sets are not installed on the target server, the counters would be shown with a status of “Not Complete”. You can use the following option to ignore warnings for health sets that are not installed in the target server.

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Click Data collection options.
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Click the Health Sets tab.

If, at a later date, health sets are installed on the Exchange target server, you can clear the check box.

Managing health tests

After you create health tests, you can modify the test settings (schedule, notifications, credentials), disable or enable a test, or delete a test.

Raw historical data is deleted; aggregated data is kept and is purged as scheduled.

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