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Rapid Recovery 6.2 - User Guide

Introduction to Rapid Recovery Core Console Core settings
Core settings key functions Rapid Recovery Core settings Core-level tools
Repositories Managing privacy Encryption Protecting machines
About protecting machines with Rapid Recovery Understanding the Rapid Recovery Agent software installer Deploying Agent to multiple machines simultaneously from the Core Console Using the Deploy Agent Software Wizard to deploy to one or more machines Modifying deploy settings Understanding protection schedules Protecting a machine About protecting multiple machines Enabling application support Settings and functions for protected Exchange servers Settings and functions for protected SQL servers
Managing protected machines Snapshots and recovery points Replication Events Reporting VM export Restoring data Bare metal restore
Bare metal restore for Windows machines Understanding boot CD creation for Windows machines Using the Universal Recovery Console for a BMR Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines Verifying a bare metal restore
Managing aging data Archiving Cloud accounts The Local Mount Utility Core Console references REST APIs About us Glossary

Restoring a directory or file using Windows Explorer

You can use Windows Explorer to copy and paste directories and files from a mounted recovery point to any Windows machine. This can be helpful when you want to distribute only a portion of a recovery point to your users.

When you copy directories and files, the access permissions of the user who is performing the copy operation are used and applied to the pasted directories and files. If you want to restore directories and files to your users while preserving original file permissions (for example, when restoring a user’s folder on a file server), see Restoring a directory or file and preserving permissions using Windows Explorer.

Restoring a directory or file and preserving permissions using Windows Explorer

You can use Windows Explorer to copy and paste directories and files from a mounted recovery point to any Windows machine while preserving file access permissions.

For example, if you need to restore a folder accessed only by specific users on a file server, you can use the Copy and Paste with Permissions commands to ensure that the restored files retain the permissions that restrict access. In this way, you can avoid having to manually apply permissions to the restored directories and files.

Some files have file access restrictions that require administrative privileges. Especially for Windows Server 2012 and later operating systems, the user attempting the restore must have the correct NTFS permissions for restoring with permissions to be successful. For example, to copy full NTFS permissions from a mount point, the user must have administrative privileges (with full NTFS permissions).

NOTE: The Paste with Permissions command is installed with Rapid Recovery Core and Agent software. It is not available in the Local Mount Utility.

Restoring clusters and cluster nodes

A restore is the process of restoring the volumes on a machine from recovery points. For a server cluster, you perform a restore at the node, or machine, level. This section provides guidelines for performing a restore for cluster volumes.

Performing a restore for CCR and DAG (Exchange) clusters

Complete the steps in this procedure to perform a restore for CCR and DAG (Exchange) clusters.

Performing a restore for SCC (Exchange, SQL) clusters

Complete the steps in this procedure to perform a restore for SCC (Exchange, SQL) clusters.

Restoring from an attached archive

There are two ways you can restore data from an archive: You can use an archive as a source for a bare metal restore (BMR); or you can attach an archive, mount a recovery point from the archive, and then restore the archived data.

When you attach an archive, it appears under Attached Archives on the Archives page of the Core Console, while the contents of the archive become accessible from the left navigation area. The contents appear under the name of the archive. Machines that were archived appear as recovery-points-only machines so that you can access the recovery points in the same way that you would for a currently protected machine: by mounting a recovery point, locating the item that you want to recover, and using Windows Explorer to copy and paste the item to your destination.

There are advantages to restoring from an attached archive rather than importing an archive to a repository.

Because these archived recovery points are likely the oldest items in the repository, they may be rolled up according to your retention policy during the next nightly job. (Although, this action does not delete them from the archive; you could re-import them the next day.)

You can remove the association by deleting the attachment.

To restore data from an attached archive, complete the following steps using the related links:

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