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Rapid Recovery 6.2 - User Guide

Introduction to Rapid Recovery Core Console Core settings
Core settings key functions Rapid Recovery Core settings Core-level tools
Repositories Managing privacy Encryption Protecting machines
About protecting machines with Rapid Recovery Understanding the Rapid Recovery Agent software installer Deploying Agent to multiple machines simultaneously from the Core Console Using the Deploy Agent Software Wizard to deploy to one or more machines Modifying deploy settings Understanding protection schedules Protecting a machine About protecting multiple machines Enabling application support Settings and functions for protected Exchange servers Settings and functions for protected SQL servers
Managing protected machines Snapshots and recovery points Replication Events Reporting VM export Restoring data Bare metal restore
Bare metal restore for Windows machines Understanding boot CD creation for Windows machines Using the Universal Recovery Console for a BMR Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines Verifying a bare metal restore
Managing aging data Archiving Cloud accounts The Local Mount Utility Core Console references REST APIs About us Glossary

Enabling archive log mode and adding VSS writer for protected Oracle databases

Before performing this procedure, you must first add an Oracle database server to protection on your Core, and enter credentials for each database into the Core Console.

Database applications require the presence of a combination of specific files (such as configuration, log, and control files), each set to a specific state, to be able application-consistent. In release 6.2, Oracle databases require archive log mode to be enabled. Until you perform this procedure, your snapshots of the database server will be crash-consistent, but not application-consistent.

Oracle VSS writer is used to capture snapshots using Volume Snapshot Service. This writer must be enabled.

Complete the steps in this procedure to verify if archive log mode is enabled; to enable that mode if required; and to add VSS writer to your Core.

1.
The Summary page displays for the protected machine.
2.
On the Summary page, scroll down to the Oracle Server Information pane.
3.
In the Oracle Server Information pane, if you see a warning notification that archive log mode is disabled, click Enable archive log mode for these databases and then click to confirm restart of the database instances.
4.
In the Oracle Server Information pane, if you see a warning notification that the Oracle VSS writer is excluded from snapshots, click Include Oracle VSS Writer and then click to confirm.

About truncating Oracle logs

Archive log mode, which is required for Oracle support in release 6.2, causes a substantial number of log files to accumulate on the database server, using valuable storage space. Relevant log files are included in backups of the Oracle server each time a recovery point snapshot is captured, rendering the local logs superfluous. For this reason, Rapid Recovery Core includes several methods for truncating Oracle logs.

1.
Rapid Recovery Core includes nightly job settings to truncate Oracle logs. Oracle log truncation is enabled by default as a nightly job using the Automatic deletion policy. In this model, logs are truncated one time daily when nightly jobs run.

This setting is designed to meet the needs of most users. If you are satisfied with this approach, you do not need to change the configuration. It is enabled by default.

The Keep newest deletion policy lets you specify the duration of time (n days, weeks, months, or years) to retain the Oracle logs before truncating. When the time period expires, log files past the threshold are then truncated one time daily when nightly jobs run.
The Keep specified number deletion policy lets you specify a specific number of log files to retain. After that threshold is reached, newer logs are retained, and the older logs are then truncated one time daily when nightly jobs run.

For more information about truncating jobs as a nightly job, see the topic Understanding nightly jobs.

Truncation of Oracle logs, by nightly job or on demand manually, occurs without requiring a transfer job.

Manually truncating Oracle database logs

This procedure is only appropriate for Oracle database servers protected on your Core.

To support the protection of Oracle databases in Rapid Recovery release 6.2, a nightly job to truncate Oracle archive logs is enabled by default. You can disable this nightly job, which will result in substantial log files accumulating on the local database server.

For any protected Oracle server, you can manually truncate Oracle database logs on demand at any time. Truncating will delete the archive logs from the local server. In each recovery point saved to your repository, the database logs persist to reflect the state of the database at the time the backup snapshot was captured.

Complete the steps in this procedure to manually truncate Oracle log files.

1.
The Summary page displays for the protected machine.
2.
On the Summary page, scroll down to the Oracle Server Information pane.
The Force Log Truncation dialog box displays.
4.
If you want to delete all of the Oracle logs from the local database server, from the Deletion policy drop-down menu, select Automatic, and then click Force.
a.
From the Deletion policy drop-down menu, select Keep newest.
b.
In the Keep logs for text field, enter a number, and then from the time period drop-down menu, select the relevant a period of time (days, weeks, months, or years).
c.
Click Force.
a.
From the Deletion policy drop-down menu, select Keep specified number.
b.
In the Number of archive files text field, enter a number representing the amount of the newest database logs to retain.
c.
Click Force.
7.
If you want to truncate logs for other database instances on this server, repeat step 3 through step 6 for each relevant database listed in the Oracle Server Information pane .

About managing protected application servers in Rapid Recovery Core

Rapid Recovery includes support for application servers such as SQL Server, Exchange Server, and Oracle. For information about specific versions Rapid Recovery supports, see the Rapid Recovery System Requirements Guide.

Options specific to these supported applications appear in the Rapid Recovery Core Console only when an instance of the software and related files are detected on protected servers. In those cases, additional options are available when you select the protected machine in the Core Console.

If you select a protected SQL Server in the left navigation menu, then the menu options that appear for that protected machine include a SQL Server drop-down menu.

For example, if you select a protected Exchange server in the left navigation menu, then the menu options that appear for that protected machine include an Exchange drop-down menu option.

If you select a protected Oracle server, on the Summary page for that protected machine, scroll down to the Oracle Server Information pane, which is unique to protected Oracle database servers.

While these options may work differently, there is some commonality. Functions you can accomplish only for protected SQL Server, Exchange Server, and Oracle servers include:

Forcing server log truncation. SQL Server, Exchange mail servers, and Oracle database servers include server logs. The process of truncating SQL Server logs identifies available space on the server. When you truncate logs for an Exchange server, in addition to identifying the available space, the process frees up more space on the server. The same is true for Oracle; log truncation removes archive log files from the Oracle server, freeing up space on the protected server.
Setting credentials for the relevant server. SQL servers allow you to set credentials for a single protected SQL Server machine, or to set default credentials for all protected SQL servers. Exchange and Oracle servers let you to set credentials for the protected machine on the Summary page for the protected server.
Viewing status for checks on recovery points from SQL Server, Exchange Server or Oracle server. Recovery points captured from a protected SQL Server, Exchange Server, or Oracle server machine have corresponding color status indicators. These colors indicate the success or failure of various checks relevant for these application servers.

The following topics discuss managing SQL Server, Exchange Server or Oracle protected machines:

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