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Rapid Recovery 6.1.2 - User Guide

Introduction to Rapid Recovery Core Console Core settings Repositories Encryption keys Protecting machines
About protecting machines with Rapid Recovery Support for dynamic and basic volumes Understanding the Rapid Recovery Agent software installer Deploying Agent to multiple machines simultaneously from the Core Console Using the Deploy Agent Software Wizard to deploy to one or more machines Modifying deploy settings Understanding protection schedules Protecting a machine About protecting multiple machines Settings and functions for protected Exchange servers Settings and functions for protected SQL servers
Managing protected machines Snapshots and recovery points Replication Events Reporting VM export Restoring data Bare metal restore
Bare metal restore for Windows machines Understanding boot CD creation for Windows machines Using the Universal Recovery Console for a BMR Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines Viewing the recovery progress Starting a restored target server Troubleshooting connections to the Universal Recovery Console Repairing boot problems Performing a file system check on the restored volume
Managing aging data Archiving Cloud storage accounts The Local Mount Utility The Central Management Console Core Console references Command Line Management utility PowerShell module
Prerequisites for using PowerShell Working with commands and cmdlets Rapid Recovery PowerShell module cmdlets Localization Qualifiers
Scripting REST APIs About us Glossary

Supported applications and cluster types

To protect your cluster properly, you must have installed the Rapid Recovery Agent software on each of the machines or nodes in the cluster. Rapid Recovery supports the application versions and cluster configurations listed in the following table.

Table 39. Supported application versions and cluster configurations

Application

Application Version and Related Cluster Configuration

Windows Failover Cluster

Microsoft Exchange Server

2007 Single Copy Cluster (SCC)

2007 Cluster Continuous Replication (CCR)

2008, 2008 R2

2010 Database Availability Group (DAG)

2008, 2008 R2

2013 DAG

2008 R2 SP1, 2012, 2012 R2

Microsoft SQL Server

2005

2008, 2008 R2

2008, 2008 R2 SCC

2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2

2012, 2014 SCC

2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2

2012, 2014 Availability Groups

2012, 2012 R2

The supported disk types include:

The supported mount types include:

Rapid Recovery release 6.1 and later includes the Rapid Snap for Virtual feature. With the Rapid Recovery Agent installed on each node, you can protect and restore supported VMs hosted on Hyper-V cluster-shared volumes (CSVs) installed on Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2016.

In addition, Rapid Recovery release 6.1 and later supports virtual export to Hyper-V CSVs installed on Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2016. For information about supported hypervisors, see .

Rapid Recovery only supports protection and restore of CSV volumes running on Windows Server 2008 R2.

The following table depicts current Rapid Recovery support for cluster-shared volumes.

Table 40. Rapid Recovery support for cluster-shared volumes

Operating System

Protect1 and Restore2 VMs on a Hyper-V CSV

Virtual Export to 
Hyper-V CSV

Protect1 and Restore3 of CSV

CSV Operating System

Rapid Recovery Version

Rapid Recovery Version

Rapid Recovery Version

6.0.x

6.1.x

6.0.x

6.1.x

6.0.x

6.1.x

Windows Server 2008 R2

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Windows Server 2012

No

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

Windows Server 2012 R2

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Windows Server 2016

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

No

1 Protect includes protection, replication, rollup, mount, and archiving.

2 Restore includes file-level restore, volume-level restore, bare metal restore, and virtual export.

3 Restore includes file-level restore, volume-level restore, and bare metal restore.

Support for Cluster Shared Volumes

To protect your cluster properly, you must have installed the Rapid Recovery Agent software on each of the machines or nodes in the cluster. Rapid Recovery supports the application versions and cluster configurations listed in the following table.

Table 39. Supported application versions and cluster configurations

Application

Application Version and Related Cluster Configuration

Windows Failover Cluster

Microsoft Exchange Server

2007 Single Copy Cluster (SCC)

2007 Cluster Continuous Replication (CCR)

2008, 2008 R2

2010 Database Availability Group (DAG)

2008, 2008 R2

2013 DAG

2008 R2 SP1, 2012, 2012 R2

Microsoft SQL Server

2005

2008, 2008 R2

2008, 2008 R2 SCC

2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2

2012, 2014 SCC

2008, 2008 R2, 2012, 2012 R2

2012, 2014 Availability Groups

2012, 2012 R2

The supported disk types include:

The supported mount types include:

Rapid Recovery release 6.1 and later includes the Rapid Snap for Virtual feature. With the Rapid Recovery Agent installed on each node, you can protect and restore supported VMs hosted on Hyper-V cluster-shared volumes (CSVs) installed on Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2016.

In addition, Rapid Recovery release 6.1 and later supports virtual export to Hyper-V CSVs installed on Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, and Windows Server 2016. For information about supported hypervisors, see .

Rapid Recovery only supports protection and restore of CSV volumes running on Windows Server 2008 R2.

The following table depicts current Rapid Recovery support for cluster-shared volumes.

Table 40. Rapid Recovery support for cluster-shared volumes

Operating System

Protect1 and Restore2 VMs on a Hyper-V CSV

Virtual Export to 
Hyper-V CSV

Protect1 and Restore3 of CSV

CSV Operating System

Rapid Recovery Version

Rapid Recovery Version

Rapid Recovery Version

6.0.x

6.1.x

6.0.x

6.1.x

6.0.x

6.1.x

Windows Server 2008 R2

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Windows Server 2012

No

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

Windows Server 2012 R2

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Windows Server 2016

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

No

1 Protect includes protection, replication, rollup, mount, and archiving.

2 Restore includes file-level restore, volume-level restore, bare metal restore, and virtual export.

3 Restore includes file-level restore, volume-level restore, and bare metal restore.

Understanding Rapid Snap for Virtual

By installing the Rapid Recovery Agent software, you can protect physical or virtual machines on the Rapid Recovery Core. The supported operating systems are indicated in system requirements in the topic Rapid Recovery Agent software requirements.

Rapid Recovery now offers another approach for protecting machines.

The Rapid Snap for Virtual feature — also known as agentless protection — of Rapid Recovery lets you protect virtual machines (VMs) on a VMware ESXi host or a Hyper-V server or host without installing the Rapid Recovery Agent on every VM.

CAUTION: Quest recommends that you limit agentless protection to no more than 200 VMs at once. For example, do not select more than 200 VMs when using the Protect Multiple Machines Wizard. Protecting more than 200 VMs results in slow performance. There is no limit to how many VMs a Core can agentlessly protect over time. For example, you could protect 200 VMs today and another 200 VMs tomorrow.

For more information, see Protecting vCenter/ESXi VMs and Protecting Hyper-V servers and clusters.

Protecting vCenter/ESXi VMs

Rapid Recovery lets you protect vCenter/ESXi VMs without installing the Rapid Recovery Agent on the VM or ESXi host, achieving agentless protection. To protect an ESXi environment, the Rapid Recovery Core works with the snapshot technology native to VMware.

Rapid Recovery agentless protection uses the ESXi client and the existing application program interface (API) to protect selected VMs on a single host without installing Rapid Recovery Agent software. The Rapid Recovery Core then communicates with the virtual machine disk (VMDK) to determine the necessary details of the protected volumes. Because Rapid Recovery creates recovery points based on volumes, not VMDKs, each volume can be separately mounted, restored, and exported.

NOTE: Rapid Recovery recommends that VMware Tools be installed on virtual machines (VMs) you want to protect on vSphere or ESXi hosts. When VMware Tools are installed on a VM using a Windows operating system (OS), the backups that the Rapid Recovery Core captures use Microsoft Volume Shadow Services (VSS). For information on the behavior of agentless VMs with or without VMware Tools, see Benefits of installing VMware Tools for agentless protection.

Agentless protection also uses VMware Changed Block Tracking (CBT) to reduce the time needed for incremental snapshots. CBT determines which blocks changed in the VMDK file, letting Rapid Recovery back up only the portions of the disk that have changed since the last snapshot. This backup method often results in shorter backup operations and reduced resource consumption on network and storage elements.

There are multiple benefits to using agentless protection. Some of the most useful attributes include the following characteristics:

While there are many reasons to use agentless protection for ESXi VMs, opt for the protection method that best suits your environments and business needs. Along with the previously mentioned benefits, there are also the following considerations to keep in mind when choosing agentless protection:

If you choose to use agentless protection for your ESXi VMs, the host must meet the following minimum requirements for agentless protection to be successful.

Protecting Hyper-V servers and clusters

To protect a Hyper-V server agentlessly, you do not need to install the Rapid Recovery Agent on any VMs. You need only install it on the host machine or cluster node. The Agent protects the virtual hard disk on the host and converts any changes to the hard disk files to a volume image or disk image, depending on the file system. A new driver provides file-level support for VMs on hosts and on cluster shared volumes (CSVs).

NOTE: Rapid Recovery supports the VHDx disk file format. It does not support the VHD format.

For protecting VMs on a CSV, the Rapid Recovery Agent and driver must be installed on each cluster node using the auto deployment feature in the Protect Multiple Machines Wizard. From the nodes, the Agent can protect all VMs operating on CSVs by creating two types of changes for every file. The first type of change is saved only before or after a snapshot or clean system restart. The second type of change resides on the disk, which makes an incremental snapshot available even if there is a power failure or dirty shutdown. The Agent installed on the node merges all of the changes into one before transferring the data.

When a host or node is running, Rapid Recovery creates an application-consistent backup. If the host is not running, no backup can be created; however, if one of the nodes is not running, then Rapid Recovery can continue taking snapshots of the VMs on the cluster.

Agentless Hyper-V protection has many of the same capabilities as traditional protection where the Agent is installed on every VM, including:

However, there are limitations to consider when choosing agentless Hyper-V protection. Capabilities that are not performed include:

Benefits of installing VMware Tools for agentless protection

When protecting virtual machines (VMs) without the using Rapid Recovery Agent, Quest recommends installing VMware Tools on protected VMs on vSphere or ESXi hosts to take full advantage of Microsoft Volume Shadow Services (VSS) functionality.

Agentless protection uses the snapshot technology native to VMware to back up protected data. When VMware Tools are installed on a VM with a Windows operating system (OS), the backups that the Rapid Recovery Core captures can also use VSS. When VMware Tools are not installed, Rapid Recovery still collects snapshots, but the absence of VMware Tools can adversely affect the state of data on your protected VM.

There are two possible data states:

Crash-consistent. The VM OS starts and can read and understand the file system.
Application consistent. The VM OS starts and can read and understand the file system. Also, files for transactional applications are in a consistent state. For example, with SQL Server, the logs match the database files, and the database opens quickly and easily.

If you recover a transactional application from a crash-consistent state, the database returns to the last valid state. That most recent valid state may be from the time of the crash, or it may be from earlier than the crash. If it is from earlier, then the database must roll forward some work to make the data files match the information in the logs. This process takes some time when you first open the database, which causes a delay when starting up the machine.

The following conditions apply based on whether VMware Tools are installed and on the powered-on state of the VM:

Table 41. Backup type conditions for VMs

VMware Tools

VM Powered On

Backup Type

Not installed

Yes

Crash-consistent

Not installed

No (dirty shut-down)

Crash-consistent

Not installed

No (clean shut-down)

Application-consistent

Installed

Yes

Application-consistent

Installed

No (dirty shut-down)

Crash-consistent

Installed

No (clean shut-down)

Application-consistent

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