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Rapid Recovery 6.0.2 - User Guide

*** Legend Introduction to Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery Understanding the Rapid Recovery Core Console Working with repositories Managing Rapid Recovery Core settings Using custom groups Working with encryption keys Protecting machines using the Rapid Recovery Core Working with Microsoft Exchange and SQL Servers Protecting server clusters Exporting protected data to virtual machines Managing protected machines Understanding replication Managing events Generating and viewing reports Restoring data Understanding bare metal restore for Windows machines Retention and archiving Managing cloud accounts Working with Linux machines Understanding the Local Mount Utility Central Management Console Understanding the Rapid Recovery Command Line Management utility Understanding the Rapid Recovery PowerShell module
Prerequisites for using PowerShell Working with commands and cmdlets Rapid Recovery PowerShell module cmdlets Localization Qualifiers
Extending Rapid Recovery jobs using scripting Rapid Recovery APIs Glossary

Using the command line to make a restored Linux machine bootable

Once you complete a clean file system check on the restored volume, you must create bootable partitions.

GNU Grand Unified Bootloader (GRUB) is a boot loader that allows administrators to configure which operating system or specific kernel configuration is used to start the system. After a BMR, the configuration file for GRUB must be modified so that the machine uses the appropriate universally unique identifier (UUID) for the root volume. Before this step you must mount the root and boot volumes, and check the UUIDs for each. This ensures that you can boot from the partition.

Note: This procedure applies to Linux machines that use GRUB1 or GRUB2. When using this procedure, ensure that the boot partition is healthy and protected.

GRUB or GRUB2 is typically installed with Linux operating systems. You can perform this procedure using the version that comes with your Linux distribution. If a version of GRUB is not installed, you will have to re-install the default version appropriate for your Linux distribution.

CAUTION:
When you boot a restored Linux machine for the first time after a BMR, Rapid Recovery takes a base image of the restored machine. Depending on the amount of data on the machine, this process takes more time than taking an incremental snapshot. For more information about base images and incremental snapshots, see Understanding protection schedules.

This task is a step in Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines. It is part of the process for Verifying the bare metal restore from the command line.

Perform the task below to create bootable partitions using the command line.

  1. You must mount the root volume first and then the boot volume. Mount each restored volume by using the following commands:
    1. To mount the root volume, type the following command and then press Enter:
      		mount /<restored volume[root]> /mnt

      For example, if /dev/sda2 is the root volume, then type mount /dev/sda2 /mnt and then press Enter.

    2. To mount the boot volume, type the following command and then press Enter:
      		mount /<restored volume[boot]> /mnt/boot

      For example, if /dev/sda1 is the boot volume, then type mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot and then press Enter.

      Note: Some system configurations may include the boot directory as part of the root volume.
  2. If the volume size is increasing — that is, if the destination volume on the new Linux machine is larger than the volume was in the recovery point — then you must delete any existing bitmap data files.
  3. Obtain the Universally Unique Identifier (UUID) of the new volumes by using the blkid command. Type the following and then press Enter:
    		blkid [volume]
    Note: You can also use the ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid command.
  4. If performing a BMR on a brand new disk on the destination machine, comment out the swap partition in fstab in your root volume.
  5. Modifying fstab and mtab paths should occur on the restored volume, not the Live DVD. There is no need to modify paths on the Live DVD. Prepare for the installation of Grand Unified Bootloader (GRUB) by typing the following commands. Following each command, press Enter:
    mount --bind /dev /mnt/dev
    mount --bind /proc /mnt/proc
    mount --bind /sys /mnt/sys
  6. Change root directory by typing the following command and then press Enter:
    		chroot /mnt /bin/bash
  7. Obtain the old UUID of the partition or partitions from the mounted recovery points /etc/fstab file and compare it to the UUIDs for the root (for Ubuntu and CentOS), boot (for CentOS and RHEL), or data partitions by typing the following command and then press Enter:
    		less /mnt/etc/fstab
  8. Obtain the old UUID of the partition or partitions from the mounted recovery points /etc/mtab file and compare it to the UUIDs for the root (for Ubuntu and CentOS), boot (for CentOS and RHEL), and data partitions by typing the following command and then press Enter:
    		less /mnt/etc/mtab
  9. If using SLES 11, install GRUB by typing the following commands, pressing Enter after each:
    grub-install --recheck /dev/sda
    grub-install /dev/sda
  10. If using Ubuntu, CentOS 6.x, RHEL 6.x, or Oracle Linux 6.x, install GRUB by typing the following command, and then press Enter:
    grub-install /dev/sda
  11. If using SLES 12, CentOS 7, RHEL 7, or Oracle 7, install GRUB2 by typing the following command, and then press Enter:
    grub2-install /dev/sda
  12. After you complete installation, run one of the following updates:
    • For SLES:
      grub-install.unsupported --recheck /dev/sda
      grub-install.unsupported /dev/sda
      update-grub
      Note: If the update-grub command does not exist on your Linux distribution, omit this option.
    • For other distributions:
      grub-install /dev/sda
      update-grub
      Note: If the update-grub command does not exist on your Linux distribution, omit this option.
  13. Remove the Live DVD disk from the CD-ROM or DVD drive and restart the Linux machine.

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Understanding the Local Mount Utility

This section describes how to download, install, and use the Windows-based Rapid Recovery Local Mount Utility (LMU) to mount recovery points and explore the contents from a file level using a machine that does not host the Rapid Recovery Core.


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About the Local Mount Utility

The LMU is a downloadable Windows-based application that lets you mount a Rapid Recovery recovery point in any of the three available modes on any Windows machine. The light-weight utility can be installed on 32-bit as well as 64-bit Windows operating systems and includes the rapidrecovery-vdisk (formerly aavdisk) and aavstor drivers, but it does not run as a service. When you install the utility, by default, it is installed in the directory C:\Program Files\AppRecovery\Local Mount Utility and a shortcut appears on the machine’s desktop.

While the utility was designed for remote access to a Rapid Recovery Core machine, you can also install the LMU on the same machine as a Rapid Recovery Core. When it runs on a Core, the application recognizes and displays all mounts from that Core, including mounts performed through the Rapid Recovery Core Console. Likewise, mounts performed on the LMU also appear in the Core Console.

When the LMU is installed on the same machine as Mailbox Restore, the LMU automatically launches Mailbox Restore when you use it to open an Exchange database. Mailbox Restore is the Dell Rapid Recovery application used to restore Microsoft Exchange data stores and items. You can install it upon installation of the LMU or the Rapid Recovery Core. For more information about Mailbox Restore, see the Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery Mailbox Restore for Microsoft Exchange User Guide.

Note: Linux machines use a command-line utility, local_mount, to query the Core for protected machines and their corresponding recovery points. Similarly, that tool lets users remotely mount a recovery point volume; lets users explore the volume contents at the file levels; and lets users restore a individual files or an entire volume from the recovery point, including BMR of the system volume. For more information, see Mounting a recovery point volume on a Linux machine, Restoring volumes for a Linux machine using the command line, and Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines, respectively..

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Downloading the Local Mount Utility

There are two ways to download the Local Mount Utility. You can download the web installer version of the software directly from the Rapid Recovery Core Console, which is practical if you are installing the LMU on the Core. You can also download either 32-bit or 64-bit executable installer files for the LMU from the Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery License Portal.

This section includes the following topics:

Downloading the LMU from the Rapid Recovery Core Console

Complete the following steps to download the Local Mount Utility from the Rapid Recovery Core Console.

  1. From the machine on which you want to install the LMU, access the Rapid Recovery Core Console by entering the console URL into your browser and logging on with your user name and password.
  2. From the Rapid Recovery Core Console, in the icon bar, click [More] menu (More), and then select Downloads.
  3. Under Local Mount Utility, click Download web installer.
  4. From the Opening LocalMountUtility-Web.exe window, click Save File.

    The file saves to the local Downloads folder. In some browsers, the folder automatically opens or a pop-up message gives you the option to run the installation.

Downloading the LMU from the Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery License Portal

If you have already registered your Rapid Recovery Core software in the Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery License Portal, do the following:

  1. From the machine on which you want to install the LMU, open a web browser and log in to the license portal at https://licenseportal.com.
  2. From the left navigation menu of the license portal, click Downloads.
  3. From the Downloads page, scroll down to Windows-Based Applications. From the Local Mount Utility section, based on the architecture of the machine on which you are installing the utility (64-bit systems or 32-bit systems on the x86 architecture), click Download.

    The file saves to the local Downloads folder. In some browsers, the folder automatically opens or a pop-up message gives you the option to run the installation.

Note: For more information about managing the Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery License Portal from the Rapid Recovery Core Console, see the Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery User Guide. For complete documentation of the license portal, see the Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery License Portal User Guide. License Portal User Guide.

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