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Rapid Recovery 6.0.2 - User Guide

*** Legend Introduction to Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery Understanding the Rapid Recovery Core Console Working with repositories Managing Rapid Recovery Core settings Using custom groups Working with encryption keys Protecting machines using the Rapid Recovery Core Working with Microsoft Exchange and SQL Servers Protecting server clusters Exporting protected data to virtual machines Managing protected machines Understanding replication Managing events Generating and viewing reports Restoring data Understanding bare metal restore for Windows machines Retention and archiving Managing cloud accounts Working with Linux machines Understanding the Local Mount Utility Central Management Console Understanding the Rapid Recovery Command Line Management utility Understanding the Rapid Recovery PowerShell module
Prerequisites for using PowerShell Working with commands and cmdlets Rapid Recovery PowerShell module cmdlets Localization Qualifiers
Extending Rapid Recovery jobs using scripting Rapid Recovery APIs Glossary

Creating partitions on the destination drive

Often, when performing a BMR, the destination drive is a new volume that may consist of a single partition. The drive on the destination machine must have the same partition table as in the recovery point, including the size of the volumes. If the destination drive does not contain the same partitions, you must create them before performing the bare metal restore. Use the fdisk utility to create partitions on the destination drive equal to the partitions on the source drive.

CAUTION:
The procedure below is just an example. Customer environments differ. You should change the commands you use to match the specifics for your environment.

This task is a step in Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines. It is part of the process for Managing Linux partitions.

  1. Optionally, you can use the Screen utility. This utility starts by default, and remains active until you reboot the machine.
    Note: If you explicitly close it and want to open it again, see Starting the Screen utility.
  2. From the command line, enter the following command and then press Enter to change privileges to run as administrator and then list existing disk partitions:
    		sudo fdisk -l

    A list of all volumes appears.

    This example assumes the volume you want to partition is /dev/sda. If your volume is different (for example, for older drives, you may see /dev/hda), change commands accordingly.

  3. To create a new boot partition, enter the following command and then press Enter:
    		sudo fdisk /dev/sda
  4. To create a new boot partition, enter the following command and then press Enter:
    		n
  5. To create a new primary partition, enter the following command and then press Enter:
    		p
  6. To specify partition number, enter the partition number and then press Enter. For example, to specify partition 1, type 1 and then press Enter.
  7. To use the first sector, 2048, press Enter.
  8. Allocate an appropriate amount to the boot partition by entering the plus sign and the allocation amount and then press Enter.

    For example, to allocate 500 M for the boot partition, type the following and then press Enter:

    		+512000K
  9. To toggle a bootable flag for the boot partition (to make the partition bootable), type the following command and then press Enter:
    		a
  10. To assign a bootable flag for the appropriate partition, type the number of the partition and then press Enter. For example, to assign a bootable flag for partition 1, type 1 and then press Enter.
  11. Continue partitioning your disk as needed.
  12. To save all changes in the fdisk utility, type the following command and then press Enter:

    w


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Formatting partitions on the destination drive

After creating partitions on a new volume on the destination drive to perform bare metal restore, if you are not using auto partition, you must format the partitions before they can be mounted. If this situation applies to you, follow this procedure to format partitions in ext3, ext4, or XFS formats.

For all other scenarios, you do not need to format partitions as described in this topic.

This task is a step in Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines. It is part of the process for Managing Linux partitions.

  1. Optionally, you can use the Screen utility. This utility starts by default, and remains active until you reboot the machine.
    Note: If you explicitly close it and want to open it again, see Starting the Screen utility.
  2. From the command line, enter the following command and then press Enter to change privileges to run as administrator and then list existing disk partitions:
    		sudo fdisk -l

    A list of all volumes appears.

    This example assumes the partition you want to format is /dev/sda1. If your volume is different (for example, for older drives, you may see /dev/hda), change commands accordingly.

  3. Select one of the following command based on the format you want to use for the destination partition:
    • To format a partition in ext3 format, enter the following command and then press Enter:
      		sudo mkfs.ext3 /dev/sda1
    • To format a partition in ext4 format, enter the following command and then press Enter:
      		sudo mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda1
    • To format a partition in XFS format, enter the following command and then press Enter:
      		sudo mkfs.xfs /dev/sda1

      The selected partition is formatted accordingly.

  4. Optionally, if you need to format other partitions, repeat this procedure.

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Mounting partitions from the command line

If performing a BMR using the Rapid Recovery Core Console, you must first mount the appropriate partitions on the destination machine. Perform this from the command line in the Universal Recovery Console.

This task is a step in Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines. It is part of the process for Managing Linux partitions.

Complete the steps in this procedure to mount partitions on the Linux machine before performing a restore.

  1. From the command line, enter the following command and then press Enter to change privileges to run as administrator and then list existing disk partitions:
    		sudo fdisk -l

    A list of all volumes appears.

  2. Format all partitions you will need to perform the BMR to the mount directory. These must match the volumes that are in the recovery point. For example, if the volume you want to mount is called sda1, and the mount directory is mnt, then type the following command and then press Enter:
  3. Mount all partitions you will need to perform the BMR to the mount directory. These must match the volumes that are in the recovery point. For example, if the volume you want to mount is called sda1, and the mount directory is mnt, then type the following command and then press Enter:
    		mount /dev/sda1 /mnt
  4. Repeat Step 3 as necessary until you have mounted all required volumes.

    After you mount the volumes, you can perform a restore to the destination Linux machine from the Rapid Recovery Core Console. See Launching a bare metal restore for Linux.


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Launching a bare metal restore for Linux

Before launching a bare metal restore (BMR) for a Linux machine, the following conditions are required:

  • To restore a recovery point saved on the Core, you must have the appropriate hardware in place. For more information, see Prerequisites for performing a bare metal restore for a Linux machine.
  • The BMR destination Linux machine must be started using the Live DVD boot image. For more information, see Managing a Linux boot image.
  • The number of volumes on the Linux machine to be restored must match the number of volumes in the recovery point. You must also decide whether to restore from the Rapid Recovery Core Console, or from the command line using local_mount. For more information, see Managing Linux partitions.
  • If restoring from the Core Console UI, the first step in launching a BMR is to select the appropriate recovery point, then initiate the restore to the hardware by specifying the IP address and temporary password you obtained from the Universal Recovery Console. You must then map the drives and start the restore.

This process is a step in Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines.

To launch a BMR from the Rapid Recovery Core Console, perform the following tasks.

If restoring from the command line using the local_mount utility, then you must first set appropriate privileges, mount volumes, execute local_mount, obtain information about the Core from the list of machines, connect to the core, obtain a list of recovery points, select the recovery point you want to roll back onto bare metal, and launch the restore.

Optionally, you may want to start the Screen utility.

To launch a BMR from the command line, perform the following tasks.


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