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Rapid Recovery 6.0.2 - User Guide

*** Legend Introduction to Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery Understanding the Rapid Recovery Core Console Working with repositories Managing Rapid Recovery Core settings Using custom groups Working with encryption keys Protecting machines using the Rapid Recovery Core Working with Microsoft Exchange and SQL Servers Protecting server clusters Exporting protected data to virtual machines Managing protected machines Understanding replication Managing events Generating and viewing reports Restoring data Understanding bare metal restore for Windows machines Retention and archiving Managing cloud accounts Working with Linux machines Understanding the Local Mount Utility Central Management Console Understanding the Rapid Recovery Command Line Management utility Understanding the Rapid Recovery PowerShell module
Prerequisites for using PowerShell Working with commands and cmdlets Rapid Recovery PowerShell module cmdlets Localization Qualifiers
Extending Rapid Recovery jobs using scripting Rapid Recovery APIs Glossary

Mounting a recovery point volume on a Linux machine

Using the local_mount utility in Rapid Recovery, you can remotely mount a volume from a recovery point as a local volume on a Linux machine.

Note: When performing this procedure, do not attempt to mount recovery points to the /tmp folder, which contains the aavdisk files.
  1. Create a new directory for mounting the recovery point (for example, you can use the mkdir command).
  2. Verify the directory exists (for example, by using the ls command).
  3. Run the Rapid Recovery local_mount utility as root, or as the super user, for example:
    	sudo local_mount
  4. At the Rapid Recovery mount prompt, enter the following command to list the protected machines.
    		lm
  5. When prompted, enter the IP address or hostname of your Rapid Recovery Core server.
  6. Enter the logon credentials for the Core server, that is, the user name and password.

    A list of the machines that are protected by the Rapid Recovery server displays. Each machine is identified by the following: line item number, host/IP address, and an ID number for the machine.

    For example: 7d658e5f-fa08-4600-95f0-5f486bc1b6a4#de0896fd-571a-4cc5-aeed-264d2c3c72f4#f377e145-dd4d-3ac3-5b15-37ce8f4913ba

  7. Enter the following command to list the recovery points that are available for a specified machine:
    		lr <line_number_of_machine>
    Note: Note that you can also enter the machine ID number in this command instead of the line item number.

    A list of the base and incremental recovery points for the machine appears. The list includes the line item number, date and timestamp, location of volume, size of recovery point, and an ID number for the volume, which includes a sequence number at the end to identify the recovery point.

    For example, 7d658e5f-fa08-4600-95f0-5f486bc1b6a4#de0896fd-571a-4cc5-aeed-264d2c3c72f4#f377e145-dd4d-3ac3-5b15-37ce8f4913ba:2

  8. Enter the following command to select and mount the specified recovery point at the specified mount point/path.
    		m <volume_recovery_point_ID_number> <volume-letter> [flag] <path>

    The flag in the command determines how to mount the recovery point. You can use one of the following options:

    • [r] - mount read-only (default). This flag lets you mount a recovery point but does not let you make changes to it.
    • [w] - mount writable. This flag lets you mount the recovery point and lets you make changes.
    • [v] - mount with previous writes. Mounting with the “v” flag lets you mount the recovery point and include any changes that were made during the previous writable mount but are not present in the recovery point.
    • [n] - do not mount nbd to <path>. A nbd (network block device) makes a socket connection between the Core and the protected machine when you perform a local mount. This flag lets you mount the recovery point without mounting the nbd, which is useful if you want to manually check the file system of the recovery point.
      Note: You can also specify a line number in the command instead of the recovery point ID number to identify the recovery point. In that case, you would use the machine line number (from the lm output), followed by the recovery point line number and volume letter, followed by the path, such as, m <machine_line_number> <recovery_point_line_number> <volume_letter> <path>. For example, if the lm output lists three protected machines, and you enter the lr command for number 2 and you mount the twenty-third recovery point volume b to /tmp/mount_dir, then the command would be:
m 2 23 b /tmp/mount_dir
  9. To verify that the mount was successful, enter the following command, which should list the attached remote volume:
    		l

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Unmounting a recovery point on a Linux machine

Complete the steps in this procedure to unmount a recovery point on a Linux machine.

  1. Run the Rapid Recovery local_mount utility as root, or as the super user, for example:
    		sudo local_mount
  2. At the Rapid Recovery mount prompt, enter the following command to list the protected machines.
    		lm
  3. When prompted, enter the IP address or hostname of your Rapid Recovery Core server.
  4. Enter the logon credentials (user name and password) for the Core server.

    A list of the machines that are protected by the Rapid Recovery server displays.

  5. Enter the following command to list the recovery points that are available for a specified machine:
    		lr <line_number_of_machine>
    Note: Note that you can also enter the machine ID number in this command instead of the line item number.

    A list of the base and incremental recovery points for the machine will display and includes. The list includes the line item number, date and timestamp, location of volume, size of recovery point, and an ID number for the volume that includes a sequence number at the end, which identifies the recovery point.

    For example: 7d658e5f-fa08-4600-95f0-5f486bc1b6a4#de0896fd-571a-4cc5-aeed-264d2c3c72f4#f377e145-dd4d-3ac3-5b15-37ce8f4913ba:2

  6. Run the l or list command to obtain a list of mounted Network Block Device (NBD)-devices. If you mount any recovery point, you will get a path to NBD-device after executing the l or list command.
  7. Enter the following command to unmount a recovery point.
    		unmount <path_of_nbd-device>
  8. Run the l or list command to verify that the unmount of the recovery point was successful.

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Restoring volumes for a Linux machine using the command line

In Rapid Recovery, you can restore volumes on your protected Linux machines using the command line local_mount utility.

Note: This process was previously referred to as Rollback. When performing this procedure, do not attempt to mount recovery points to the /tmp folder, which contains the rapidrecovery-vdisk (formerly aavdisk) files. Restoring volumes is also supported for your protected machines within the Rapid Recovery Core Console. See About restoring volumes from a recovery point for more information.
CAUTION:
To restore the system or root (/) partition or entire operating system, see Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines.
  1. Run the Rapid Recovery local_mount utility as root, for example:
    		sudo local_mount
  2. At the Rapid Recovery mount prompt, enter the following command to list the protected machines.
    		lm
  3. When prompted, enter the IP address or hostname of your Rapid Recovery Core server.
  4. Enter the logon credentials, that is, the user name and password, for this server.

    A list displays showing the machines protected by this Rapid Recovery server. It lists the protected machines found by line item number, host/IP address, and an ID number for the machine (for example: 7d658e5f-fa08-4600-95f0-5f486bc1b6a4#de0896fd-571a-4cc5-aeed-264d2c3c72f4#f377e145-dd4d-3ac3-5b15-37ce8f4913ba:2).

  5. Enter the following command to list the currently mounted recovery points for the specified machine:
    		lr <machine_line_item_number>
    Note: Note that you can also enter the machine ID number in this command instead of the line item number.

    A list displays that shows the base and incremental recovery points for that machine. This list includes a line item number, date/timestamp, location of volume, size of recovery point, and an ID number for the volume that includes a sequence number at the end (for example,
”293cc667-44b4-48ab-91d8-44bc74252a4f:2”), which identifies the recovery point.

  6. Enter the following command to select a recovery point to restore:
    		r <volume_recovery_point_ID_number> <device path>

    This command restores the volume image specified by the ID from the Core to the specified path. The path for the restore is the path for the device file descriptor, not the directory to which it is mounted.

    • You can also specify a line number in the command instead of the recovery point ID number to identify the recovery point. In that case, you would use the protected machine line number (from the lm output), followed by the recovery point line number and volume letter, followed by the path, such as, r <machine_line_item_number> <recovery_point_line_number> <volume_letter> <path>. In this command, <path> is the file descriptor for the actual volume.

      For example, if the lm output lists three protected machines, and you enter the lr command for protected machine number 2, and you want to restore the 23 recovery point volume b to the volume that was mounted to the directory /dev/sda5, the command would be:

      r2 23 b /dev/sda5
      Note: It is possible to restore to / if needed. If performing a Bare Metal Restore using a Live DVD, it is assumed you want to restore to a different machine. For more information, see Launching a bare metal restore for Linux.
  7. When prompted to proceed, enter y for Yes.

    Once the restore proceeds, a series of messages will display to notify you of the status.

  8. Upon a successful restore, the local_mount utility will automatically mount and re-attach the kernel module to the restored volume if the target was previously protected and mounted. If not, you will need to mount the restored volume to the local disk and then should verify that the files are restored (for example, you can use the sudo mount command and then the ls command.)

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Performing a bare metal restore for Linux machines

In Rapid Recovery you can perform a Bare Metal Restore (BMR) for a Linux machine, including a restore of the system volume. When you restore a Linux machine, you will roll back to the boot volume recovery point. BMR functionality is supported using the command line local_mount utility and from within the Core Console UI.

CAUTION:
Before you begin the BMR process, be sure that any Linux machine you want to restore does not include an ext2 boot partition. When BMR is performed on a machine with ext2 partition type, the process typically results in a machine that does not start. To perform a BMR in this case, you would have needed to convert any ext2 partitions to ext3, ext4, or XFS before you began protecting and backing up the machine.
CAUTION:
When you boot a restored Linux machine for the first time after a BMR, Rapid Recovery takes a base image of the restored machine. Depending on the amount of data on the machine, this process takes more time than taking an incremental snapshot. For more information about base images and incremental snapshots, see Understanding protection schedules.

To perform a bare metal restore for Linux machines, perform the following tasks.


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