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Rapid Recovery 6.0.2 - User Guide

*** Legend Introduction to Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery Understanding the Rapid Recovery Core Console Working with repositories Managing Rapid Recovery Core settings Using custom groups Working with encryption keys Protecting machines using the Rapid Recovery Core Working with Microsoft Exchange and SQL Servers Protecting server clusters Exporting protected data to virtual machines Managing protected machines Understanding replication Managing events Generating and viewing reports Restoring data Understanding bare metal restore for Windows machines Retention and archiving Managing cloud accounts Working with Linux machines Understanding the Local Mount Utility Central Management Console Understanding the Rapid Recovery Command Line Management utility Understanding the Rapid Recovery PowerShell module
Prerequisites for using PowerShell Working with commands and cmdlets Rapid Recovery PowerShell module cmdlets Localization Qualifiers
Extending Rapid Recovery jobs using scripting Rapid Recovery APIs Glossary

Viewing the Recovery Points Only menu

The Recovery Points Only menu appears in the left navigation area if one of the following is true:

  • if your Rapid Recovery Core retains some recovery points from a machine that was previously protected
  • if you removed replication but retained the recovery points.
As with all menu labels in the navigation area, the label for this menu appears in all upper-case letters.

You can collapse or expand the view of recovery points-only machines by clicking the arrow on the left side of this menu.

The menu includes a drop-down menu on the right side which lists functions that can be performed on all recovery points-only machines simultaneously. In this case, the only function you can perform is to remove recovery points from the Core.

CAUTION:
This action removes all of the recovery points-only machines in your Rapid Recovery Core, permanently deleting them and precluding you from restoring information from those recovery points from this Core.

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Viewing the Custom Groups menu

Describes the Custom Groups menu that appears in the left navigation menu if you define custom groups in your Core.

The custom groups menu appears in the left navigation area only if you have defined one or more custom groups. As with all menu labels in the navigation area, the label for this menu appears in all upper-case letters.

You can collapse or expand the view of items in this menu by clicking the arrow on its left side.

The custom groups menu includes a drop-down menu on the right side which lists functions that can be performed simultaneously on all of the like items in that group.

For more information, see Understanding custom groups.


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Working with repositories

This section describes how to work with repositories. It discusses the deduplication volume manager repository and describes its features and attributes. It describes types of deduplication used in Rapid Recovery, and how deduplication is used throughout the application. Then this section describes how to manage DVM repositories, including creating a repository, viewing and editing its details, and deleting a repository. You can learn how to open a repository from one Core on another Core. Finally, this section describes how to migrate recovery points manually from one repository to another.


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Understanding repositories

A repository is used to store the snapshots that are captured from your protected workstations and servers. The repository can reside on different storage technologies such as Storage Area Network (SAN), Direct Attached Storage (DAS), or Network Attached Storage (NAS).

Note: Store repositories for Rapid Recovery Core on primary storage devices. Speed for the storage volume is the most critical factor. Archival storage devices such as Data Domain are not supported due to performance limitations. Similarly, do not store repositories on NAS filers that tier to the cloud, as these devices tend to have performance limitations when used as primary storage.

DAS offers the highest data bandwidth and fastest access rate, and is easy to implement. For optimum results, use DAS with Redundant Array of Independent Disks (RAID) 6 storage. For more information, see Dell Knowledge Base article 118153, "Repository Options: Direct Attached Storage, Storage Area Network or Network Attached Storage."

The storage location for any repository should always be in a subdirectory that you specify (for example, E:\Repository), never in the root of a volume (for example, E:\).

The DVM repository format uses Deduplication Volume Manager (DVM). DVM supports multiple volumes, up to 255 repositories on a single Core, and supports extents. You can create DVM repositories on machines with Windows operating systems only. You can use this repository type when upgrading existing AppAssure installations, and when using new Rapid Recovery installations. You can specify the size of a DVM repository upon creation, and can add extents later.

DVM Repository features and attributes include:

  • Supports recovery from legacy AppAssure 5.x as well as new Rapid Recovery 6.x archives and recovery points
  • Supports storage locations on Windows OS only. Repository volume can be local (on storage attached to the Core server), or on a storage location on a Common Internet File System (CIFS) shared location.
  • Supported storage types include Storage Area Network (SAN), Direct Attached Storage (DAS), or Network Attached Storage (NAS)
  • Requires 8GB RAM, preferably Error Checking and Correction (ECC) memory
  • Requires quad core processor on Core machine (this long-standing requirement is now enforced)
  • Supports multiple DVM repositories per host
  • No additional services required; DVM repository uses native Core services for communication with Core and for tracking events
  • Each DVM repository supports up to 4096 repository extents (also called storage locations)
  • Fixed size; DVM repository requires you to specify the repository size on a volume. The size that you specify cannot exceed the size of the volume. Each volume you define as a storage location must have a minimum of 1GB of free space available on it.
  • Repository storage location can be a simple or dynamic disk, with speed the most important factor
  • Can use standard encryption keys created and managed in the Core Console (Core-based encryption)
  • Deduplicates data across the entire repository (or across encryption domains within each repository, if encryption keys are used)
  • Uses a dedicated, resizeable DVM deduplication cache, with a configurable storage location in Core settings
  • Optimized for writing data, storing snapshot data in a repository local to the Core, with all data processed through the Core
  • Cannot be renamed after creation
  • New repositories of this type can be created using REST APIs, the Rapid Recovery Command Line Management Utility (cmdutil.exe), or Windows PowerShell® cmdlet

When you create a DVM repository, the Rapid Recovery Core pre-allocates the storage space required for the data and metadata in the specified location. The minimum DVM repository size is 1GB, which for practical purposes is generally too small except for testing.

Since DVM deduplication requires a primary and secondary cache, ensure the storage space you reserve is twice the size of your deduplication cache. For example, if you have 1.5GB reserved in the DVM deduplication cache settings on the Core, reserve 3GB on the cache volume. The default installation path for the cache is on the C drive. For more information, see Understanding deduplication cache and storage locations.

You can create multiple independent repositories associated with a single Core, up to 255 DVM repositories. Repositories can span across different storage technologies.

You can further increase the size of a DVM repository by adding new file extents or specifications. An extended repository can contain up to 4096 extents that span across different storage technologies.

For more information on working with DVM repositories, see Managing a DVM repository.


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