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Rapid Recovery 6.0.2 - User Guide

*** Legend Introduction to Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery Understanding the Rapid Recovery Core Console Working with repositories Managing Rapid Recovery Core settings Using custom groups Working with encryption keys Protecting machines using the Rapid Recovery Core Working with Microsoft Exchange and SQL Servers Protecting server clusters Exporting protected data to virtual machines Managing protected machines Understanding replication Managing events Generating and viewing reports Restoring data Understanding bare metal restore for Windows machines Retention and archiving Managing cloud accounts Working with Linux machines Understanding the Local Mount Utility Central Management Console Understanding the Rapid Recovery Command Line Management utility Understanding the Rapid Recovery PowerShell module
Prerequisites for using PowerShell Working with commands and cmdlets Rapid Recovery PowerShell module cmdlets Localization Qualifiers
Extending Rapid Recovery jobs using scripting Rapid Recovery APIs Glossary

Restoring volumes from a recovery point

Follow the procedure below to restore volumes from a recovery point.

  1. To restore a volume on a protected machine from the Restore icon, navigate to the Core Console and click Restore from the Rapid Recovery button bar.

    The Restore Machine Wizard appears.

  2. From the Protected Machines page, select the protected machine for which you want to restore data, and then click Next.
    Note: The protected machine must have the Agent software installed and must have recovery points from which you will perform the restore operation.

    The Recovery Points page appears.

  3. From the list of recovery points, search for the snapshot you want to restore to the agent machine.
    • If necessary, use the buttons at the bottom of the page to display additional pages of recovery points.
    • Optionally, If you want to limit the amount of recovery points showing in the Recovery Points page of the wizard, you can filter by volumes (if defined) or by creation date of the recovery point.
  4. Click any recovery point to select it, and then click Next.

    The Destination page appears.

  5. On the Destination page, choose the machine to which you want to restore data as follows:
    • If you want to restore data from the selected recovery point to the same agent machine (for example, Machine1), and if the volumes you want to restore do not include the system volume, then select Recover to a protected machine (only non-system volumes), verify that the destination machine (Machine1) is selected, and then click Next.

      The Volume Mapping page appears. Proceed to Step 9.

    • If you want to restore data from the selected recovery point to a different protected machine (for example, to replace the contents of Machine2 with data from Machine1), then select Recover to a protected machine (only non-system volumes), select the destination machine (for example, Machine2) from the list, and then click Next.

      The Volume Mapping page appears. Proceed to Step 9.

    • If you want to restore from the selected recovery point to the same machine or a different machine using a boot CD, this is considered a bare metal restore (BMR). For information about BMR, see Understanding bare metal restore for Windows machines.
      Note: Performing a BMR has specific requirements, based on the operating system of the agent machine you want to restore. To understand these prerequisites, see Prerequisites for performing a bare metal restore for a Windows machine and Prerequisites for performing a bare metal restore for a Linux machine, respectively.

      If the volumes you want to restore include the system volume, then select Recover to any target machine using a boot CD. This option will prompt you to create a boot CD.

    • If you want to restore from a recovery point to a system volume (for example, the C drive of the agent machine named Machine1), this is also considered a BMR. Select Recover to any target machine using a boot CD. This option will prompt you to create a boot CD.
  6. Start the machine you want to restore to using the boot CD. For more information, for BMR on a Windows machine, see Loading the boot CD and starting the target machine and for BMR on a Linux machine, see Loading the Live DVD and starting the target machine.
  7. Back on the Core server, in the Destination page of the Restore Machine Wizard, select I already have a boot CD running on the target machine and enter the information about the machine to which you want to connect as described in the following table.
    Table 1. Machine information
    Text Box Description
    IP Address The IP address of the machine to which you want to restore. This is identical to the IP address displayed in the URC.
    Authentication Key The specific password to connect to the selected server. This is identical to the Authentication Key displayed in the URC.
  8. Click Next.

    If the connection information you entered matches the URC, and if the Core and the target server can identify each other properly on the network, then the volumes for the selected recovery point are loaded, and the Disk Mapping page appears.

    To complete your BMR from the Restore Machine Wizard, proceed to Step 9 of the topic About performing a bare metal restore using the Restore Machine Wizard.

    Note: While Rapid Recovery supports FAT32 and ReFS partitions, at present, only full restore and BMR are supported as a driver limitation exists with ReFS, so restore is implemented in user mode, VM export, and so on. If a Core is protecting at least one agent volume that contains the ReFS file system, it should be installed on Windows 8/2012 which provides native support of ReFS, otherwise functionality will be limited and operations that involve such things as mounting a volume image will not work. The Rapid Recovery Core Console will present applicable error messages in these occurrences.

Bare metal restore of Storage Spaces disks configuration (a feature of Windows 8.1) is also not supported in this release. For details, see the Rapid Recovery Installation and Upgrade Guide.
  9. On the Volume Mapping page, for each volume in the recovery point that you want to restore, select the appropriate destination volume. If you do not want to restore a volume, in the Destination Volumes column, select Do not restore.
  10. Select Show advanced options and then do the following:
    • For restoring to Windows machines, if you want to use Live Recovery, select Live Recovery.

      Using the Live Recovery instant recovery technology in Rapid Recovery, you can instantly recover or restore data to your physical machines or to virtual machines from stored recovery points of Windows machines, which includes Microsoft Windows Storage Spaces. Live Recovery is not available for Linux machines or VMs using agentless protection.

    • If you want to force dismount, select Force Dismount.

      If you do not force a dismount before restoring data, the restore may fail with a volume in use error.

  11. If the volumes you want to restore contain SQL or Microsoft Exchange databases, then on the Dismount Databases page, you are prompted to dismount them. Optionally, if you want to remount these databases after the restore is complete, select Automatically remount all databases after the recovery point is restored. Then click Finish.
  12. Click OK to confirm the status message that the restore process has started.
  13. Optionally, to monitor the progress of your restore action, on the Core Console, click Events. For more information, see Viewing events using tasks, alerts, and journal.

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Restoring a directory or file using Windows Explorer

You can use Windows Explorer to copy and paste directories and files from a mounted recovery point to any Windows machine. This can be helpful when you want to distribute only a portion of a recovery point to your users.

When you copy directories and files, the access permissions of the user who is performing the copy operation are used and applied to the pasted directories and files. If you want to restore directories and files to your users while preserving original file permissions (for example, when restoring a user’s folder on a file server), see Restoring a directory or file and preserving permissions using Windows Explorer.

  1. Mount the recovery point that contains the data you want to restore. For details, see Mounting a recovery point.
  2. In Windows Explorer, navigate to the mounted recovery point and select the directories and files that you want to restore. Right-click and select Copy.
  3. In Windows Explorer, navigate to the machine location to where you want to restore the data. Right-click and select Paste.

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Restoring a directory or file and preserving permissions using Windows Explorer

You can use Windows Explorer to copy and paste directories and files from a mounted recovery point to any Windows machine while preserving file access permissions.

For example, if you need to restore a folder accessed only by specific users on a file server, you can use the Copy and Paste with Permissions commands to ensure that the restored files retain the permissions that restrict access. In this way, you can avoid having to manually apply permissions to the restored directories and files.

Note: The Paste with Permissions command is installed with Rapid Recovery Core and Agent software. It is not available in the Local Mount Utility.
  1. Mount the recovery point that contains the data you want to restore. For details, see Mounting a recovery point.
  2. In Windows Explorer, navigate to the mounted recovery point and select the directories and files that you want to restore. Right-click and select Copy.
  3. In Windows Explorer, navigate to the machine location to where you want to restore the data. Right-click and select Paste with Permissions.
    Note: In this step, if the Paste with Permissions command is disabled on the right-click menu, then Windows Explorer is not aware of the files that you want to copy. Repeat Step 2 to enable the Paste with Permissions command on the right-click menu.

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Restoring from an attached archive

There are two ways you can restore data from an archive: You can use an archive as a source for a bare metal restore (BMR); or you can attach an archive, mount a recovery point from the archive, and then restore the archived data.

When you attach an archive, it appears under Attached Archives on the Archives page of the Core Console, while the contents of the archive become accessible from the left navigation area. The contents appear under the name of the archive. Machines that were archived appear as recovery-points-only machines so that you can access the recovery points in the same way that you would for a currently protected machine: by mounting a recovery point, locating the item that you want to recover, and using Windows Explorer to copy and paste the item to your destination.

There are advantages to restoring from an attached archive rather than importing an archive to a repository.
  • Restoring from an attached archive saves the time you may spend importing an entire archive to a repository.
  • Also, when you import an archive, the archived recovery points are added to the repository.

    Because these archived recovery points are likely the oldest items in the repository, they may be rolled up according to your retention policy during the next nightly job. (Although, this action does not delete them from the archive; you could re-import them the next day.)

  • Lastly, the Core remembers the attachment association with archives, even after you detach an archive, making it easier and faster to attach the archive again later.

    You can remove the association by deleting the attachment.

To restore data from an attached archive, complete the following steps using the related links:

Note: The procedure for restoring from an attached archive assumes that you already have an archive of rolled-up recovery points.
  1. Attach the archive.
  2. Mount the recovery point that contains the data that you want to recover.
  3. Restore data using any of the following methods:
    • Restore data, such as file or folder, from the recovery point .
    • Restore the entire recovery point.
    • Export the recovery point to a virtual machine.

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