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Rapid Recovery 6.0.2 - User Guide

*** Legend Introduction to Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery Understanding the Rapid Recovery Core Console Working with repositories Managing Rapid Recovery Core settings Using custom groups Working with encryption keys Protecting machines using the Rapid Recovery Core Working with Microsoft Exchange and SQL Servers Protecting server clusters Exporting protected data to virtual machines Managing protected machines Understanding replication Managing events Generating and viewing reports Restoring data Understanding bare metal restore for Windows machines Retention and archiving Managing cloud accounts Working with Linux machines Understanding the Local Mount Utility Central Management Console Understanding the Rapid Recovery Command Line Management utility Understanding the Rapid Recovery PowerShell module
Prerequisites for using PowerShell Working with commands and cmdlets Rapid Recovery PowerShell module cmdlets Localization Qualifiers
Extending Rapid Recovery jobs using scripting Rapid Recovery APIs Glossary

Protecting machines using the Rapid Recovery Core

This section describes how to protect, configure, and manage the protected machines in your Rapid Recovery environment.


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About protecting machines with Rapid Recovery

To protect your data using Rapid Recovery, you need to add the workstations and servers for protection in the Rapid Recovery Core Console; for example, your Exchange server, SQL Server, Linux server, and so on.

You must install the Rapid Recovery Agent software on all physical or virtual machines you want to protect in the Core.

Note: As an exception to this rule, if protecting virtual machines on a VMware or ESXi host, you can use agentless protection. For more information, including restrictions for agentless protection, see Understanding agentless protection.

In the Rapid Recovery Core Console, using one of the Protect Machine wizards, you can identify the machines you want to protect. You can do the following:

  • You can protect a single machine using the Protect Machine wizard, which connects to the machine using network hostname or IP address. For more information on how to protect a single machine, Protecting a machine.
  • You can protect a network cluster using the Protect Cluster function, which connects to the cluster and its nodes using network hostname or IP address.
  • You can protect multiple machines simultaneously using the Protect Multiple Machines wizard, which connects to the machines using Microsoft Active Directory®, or to a vCenter or ESXi host; or you can specify the network hostname or IP addresses for a list of machines you enter manually.
Note: Dell recommends limiting the number of machines you protect simultaneously to 50 or fewer, to preclude experiencing resource constraints that may cause the protect operation to fail.

When identifying your protection requirements for a single machine in the wizard, you can specify which volumes to protect. When you protect multiple machines, all volumes are protected by default. (You can change this later on an individual machine basis).

The wizard also lets you define a customized schedule for protection (or re-use an existing schedule).

Using advanced options, you can add additional security measures by specifying or applying an encryption key to backups for the machines you want to protect.

Finally, if one does not already exist, you can define a repository using the wizard.

After installing the Agent software, each machine must be restarted after installation.

For more information on how to protect workstations and servers, see Protecting a machine.

CAUTION:
Rapid Recovery does not support bare metal restore (BMRs) of Linux machines with ext2 boot partitions. Any BMR performed on a machine with this type of partition results in a machine that does not start. If you want to be able to perform a BMR on a Linux machine with an ext2 boot partition, you must convert the ext2 boot partition to ext3 or ext4 before you begin protecting and backing up the machine.

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Support for dynamic and basic volumes

Rapid Recovery supports taking snapshots of all dynamic and basic volumes. Rapid Recovery also supports exporting simple dynamic volumes that are on a single physical disk. As their name implies, simple dynamic volumes are not striped, mirrored, spanned, or RAID volumes.

The behavior for virtual export of dynamic disks differs, based on whether the volume you want to export is protected by the Rapid Recovery Agent software, or is a VM using agentless protection. This is because non-simple or complex dynamic volumes have arbitrary disk geometries that cannot be fully interpreted by the Rapid Recovery Agent.

When you try to export a complex dynamic disk from a machine with the Rapid Recovery Agent software, a notification appears in the user interface to alert you that exports are limited and restricted to simple dynamic volumes. If you attempt to export anything other than a simple dynamic volume with the Rapid Recovery Agent, the export job fails.

In contrast, dynamic volumes for VMs you protect agentlessly are supported for protection, virtual export, restoring data, and BMR, and for repository storage, with some important restrictions. For example:

  • Protection: In the case when a dynamic volume spans multiple disks, you must protect those disks together to maintain the integrity of the volume.
  • Virtual export: You can export complex dynamic volumes such as striped, mirrored, spanned, or RAID volumes from an ESXi host using agentless protection.

    However, the volumes are exported at the disk level, with no volume parsing. For example, if exporting a dynamic volume spanned across two disks, the export will include two distinct disk volumes.

    CAUTION:
    When exporting a dynamic volume that spans multiple disks, you must export the dynamic disks with the original system volumes to preserve the disk types.
  • Restoring data: When restoring a dynamic volume that spans multiple disks, you must restore the dynamic disks with the original system volumes to preserve the disk types. If you restore only one disk, you will break the disk configuration.

Repository storage: Additionally, Rapid Recovery supports the creation of repositories on complex dynamic volumes (striped, mirrored, spanned, or RAID). The file system of the machine hosting the repository must be NTFS or ReFS.


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Understanding the Rapid Recovery Agent software installer

Rapid Recovery lets you download installers from the Rapid Recovery Core. From the Downloads page, you can choose to download the Agent Installer, the Local Mount Utility (LMU), or an SNMP MIB file. For more information about the LMU, see Understanding the Local Mount Utility. For more information about SNMP, see Understanding SNMP settings.

Note: For access to the Agent Installer, see Downloading the Rapid Recovery Agent Installer. For more information about deploying the Agent Installer, see the Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery Installation and Upgrade Guide.

The Agent installer is used to install the Rapid Recovery Agent application on machines that are intended to be protected by the Rapid Recovery Core. If you determine that you have a machine that requires the Agent Installer, you can download the web installer from the Downloads page of the Rapid Recovery Core Console.

Note: Downloading of the Core is performed from the Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery License Portal. To download the Rapid Recovery Core installer, visit https://licenseportal.com. For more information, see the Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery License Portal User Guide.

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