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Rapid Recovery 6.0.2 - User Guide

*** Legend Introduction to Dell Data Protection | Rapid Recovery Understanding the Rapid Recovery Core Console Working with repositories Managing Rapid Recovery Core settings Using custom groups Working with encryption keys Protecting machines using the Rapid Recovery Core Working with Microsoft Exchange and SQL Servers Protecting server clusters Exporting protected data to virtual machines Managing protected machines Understanding replication Managing events Generating and viewing reports Restoring data Understanding bare metal restore for Windows machines Retention and archiving Managing cloud accounts Working with Linux machines Understanding the Local Mount Utility Central Management Console Understanding the Rapid Recovery Command Line Management utility Understanding the Rapid Recovery PowerShell module
Prerequisites for using PowerShell Working with commands and cmdlets Rapid Recovery PowerShell module cmdlets Localization Qualifiers
Extending Rapid Recovery jobs using scripting Rapid Recovery APIs Glossary

Pause

An administrator can pause snapshots, export to virtual machines, or replicate a Core. The pause command accepts three parameters: snapshot, vmexport, and replication. Only one parameter can be specified. A snapshot can be paused until a certain time, if a time parameter is specified.

A user can pause replication in three ways:

  • On a source Core for all protected machines.(-[outgoing]).

    The administrator must specify the remote machine name with the outgoing replication pairing to pause outgoing replication on the source Core:

    >cmdutil /pause replication /o 10.10.12.10
  • On the source Core for a single protected machine.(-protectedserver):
    >cmdutil /pause replication /protectedserver 10.10.12.97
  • On target Core (-incoming).

    If the local Core is a target Core, the administrator can pause replication by specifying the source Core using the incoming parameter:

    >cmdutil /pause replication /i 10.10.12.25

Usage

The usage for the command is as follows:

/pause [snapshot | vmexport | replication] -core [host name] -user [user name] -password [password] -all | -protectedserver [name | IP address] -incoming [host name] | outgoing [host name] -time [time string]

Command Options

The following table describes the options available for the pause command:

Table 1. Pause command options
Option Description
-?
Display this help message.
-pause
[snapshots], [replication] or [vmexport].
-core
Optional. Remote Core host machine IP address (with an optional port number). By default, the connection is made to the Core installed on the local machine.
-user
Optional. User name for the remote Core host machine. If you specify a user name, you must also provide a password. If none is provided, then the credentials for the logged-on user are used.
-password
Optional. Password to the remote Core host machine. If you specify a password, you also have to provide a user name. If none is provided, then the credentials for the logged-on user are used.
-all
Optional. Pause all agents on the selected Core.
-protectedserver
Optional. Pause current protected server.
-incoming
Optional. Host name of the remote core that replicates to the core machine.
-outgoing
Optional. Host name of the remote target core to which data is replicated.
-time
Optional. The time in the format ‘Day-Hours-Minutes’ when the snapshots will be resumed (only for snapshots pause).

Examples:

Pause creating snapshots for a specific protected server:

>cmdutil /pause snapshot -core 10.10.10.10 -user administrator -password 23WE@#$sdd -protectedserver 10.10.10.4

Pause creating snapshots for a protected machine and resume it after three days, 20 hours, and 50 minutes:

>cmdutil /pause snapshot -core 10.10.10.10 -user administrator -password 23WE@#$sdd -protectedserver 10.10.10.4 -time 3-20-50

Pause export to virtual machine for all protected machines on the core:

>cmdutil /pause vmexport -core 10.10.10.10 /user administrator -password 23WE@#$sdd –all

Pause outgoing replication on the core for a specific protected machine:

>cmdutil /pause replication –core 10.10.10.10 -user administrator -password 23WE@#$sdd –protectedserver 10.10.1.76

Pause outgoing replication for all protected machines on the target core:

>cmdutil /pause replication -core 10.10.10.10 -user administrator -password -23WE@#$sdd –outgoing 10.10.1.63

Pause incoming replication for all machines on the target core:

>cmdutil /pause replication –core 10.10.10.10 -user administrator -password 23WE@#$sdd –incoming 10.10.1.82

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Protect

The protect command adds a server under protection by a core.

Usage

The usage for the command is as follows:

/protect -core [host name] -user [user name] -password [password] -repository [name] -agentname [name | IP address] -agentusername [user name] -agentpassword [password] -agentport [port] -volumes [volume names]

Command Options

The following table describes the options available for the protect command:

Table 1. Protect command options
Option Description
-?
Display this help message.
-core
Optional. Remote Core host machine IP address (with an optional port number). By default, the connection is made to the Core installed on the local machine.
-user
Optional. User name for the remote Core host machine. If you specify a user name, you must also provide a password. If none is provided, then the credentials for the logged-on user are used.
-password
Optional. Password to the remote Core host machine. If you specify a password, you also have to provide a user name. If none is provided, then the credentials for the logged-on user are used.
-repository
Name of a repository on the Core to which the protected machine data should be stored. The name must be enclosed in double quotes.
-agentname
Name or IP address of the server you want to protect.
-agentusername
User name for the server to be protected.
-agentpassword
Password for the server to be protected.
-agentport
Protected server port number.
-volumes
List of volumes to protect. Values must be enclosed in double quotes and separated by a space. Do not use trailing slashes in volume names; for example: “c:” “d:”.

Example:

Protect specific volumes of a server with the Core:

>cmdutil /protect -core 10.10.10.10 -username administrator -password 23WE@#$sdd -repository “Repository 1” -agentname 10.10.9.120 -agentport 5002 -agentusername administrator agentpassword 12345 -volumes “c:” “d:”

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ProtectCluster

The protectcluster command adds a cluster under protection by a core.

Usage

The usage for the command is as follows:

/protectcluster -core [host name] -user [user name] -password [password] -repository [name] -clustername [name | IP address] -clusterusername [user name] -clusterpassword [password] -clusterport [port] -clustervolumes [volume names] -clusternodes [cluster nodes collection]

Command Options

The following table describes the options available for the protectcluster command:

Table 1. ProtectCluster command options
Option Description
-?
Display this help message.
-core
Optional. Remote Core host machine IP address (with an optional port number). By default, the connection is made to the Core installed on the local machine.
-user
Optional. User name for the remote Core host machine. If you specify a user name, you must also provide a password. If none is provided, then the credentials for the logged-on user are used.
-password
Optional. Password to the remote Core host machine. If you specify a password, you also have to provide a user name. If none is provided, then the credentials for the logged-on user are used.
-repository
Name of a repository on the Core to which the protected machine data should be stored. The name must be enclosed in double quotes.
-clustername
Name or IP address of the cluster you want to protect.
-clusterusername
User name for the cluster to be protected.
-clusterpassword
Password for the cluster to be protected.
-clusterport
Protected cluster server port number.
-clustervolumes
List of volumes to protect. Values must be enclosed in double quotes and separated by a space. Do not use trailing slashes in volume names; for example: “c:” “d:”.
-clusternodes
List of the cluster nodes and the volumes you want to protect on each node.

Example:

Protect specific volumes of a cluster server with the Core:

>cmdutil /protectcluster -core 10.10.10.10 -username administrator -password 23WE@#$sdd -repository “Repository 1” -clustername 10.10.8.150 -clusterport 8006 -clusterusername clusterAdmin clusterpassword password -volumes “C:\ClusterStorage\Volume1” -clusternodes nodeName 10.10.8.150 volumes “c:” nodeName 10.10.8.151 volumes “c:”

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ProtectEsxServer

You can use the protectesxserver command whenever you want to add a VMware ESX(i) virtual machine to protection.

Usage

The usage for the command is as follows:

/protectesxserver -core [host name] -user [user name] -password [password] -repository [repository name] -server [name | IP address] -serverusername [user name] -serverpassword [password for server login] -serverport [port] -virtualMachines [virtual machines collection | all] -autoProtect [object ID or name collection]

Command Options

The following table describes the options available for the protectesxserver command:

Table 1. ProtectEsxServer command options
Option Description
-?
Display this help message.
-core
Optional. Remote Core host machine IP address (with an optional port number). By default, the connection is made to the Core installed on the local machine.
-user
Optional. The user name for the remote Core host machine. If you specify a user name, you must also provide a password. If none is provided, then the credentials for the logged-on user are used.
-password
Optional. The password to the remote Core host machine. If you specify a password, you also have to provide a user name. If none is provided, then the credentials for the logged-on user are used.
-repository
Required. The name of the repository that is associated with the Core that you want to use to protect the virtual machine.
Note: You must enclose the name in double quotes.
-server
The name or IP address for the vCenter or ESXi server you want to protect.
-serverusername
The user name for logging in to the vCenter or ESXi server that you want to protect.
-serverpassword
The password for logging in to the vCenter or ESXi server that you want to protect.
-serverport
Optional. The port number for the vCenter or ESXi server that you want to protect.
-virtualmachines
Optional. This option lets you list the virtual machines that you want to protect.
-autoprotect
Optional. This option lets you list new virtual machines that you want to automatically protect.

Examples:

Protect specific virtual machines from a vCenter or ESXi server with the Core:

>cmdutil /protectesxserver -core 10.10.10.10 -user admin -password password -repository "Repository 1" -server 10.10.8.150 -serverport 443 -serverusername root -serverpassword password -virtualmachines "VM1" "VM2" -autoprotect "Folder1"

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