Chat now with support
Chat with Support

KACE as a Service 7.1 - Administrator Guide

About the KACE Systems Management Appliance (K1000) Getting started
Configuring the appliance
Requirements and specifications Power-on the appliance and log in to the Administrator Console Access the Command Line Console Tracking configuration changes Configuring System-level and Admin-level General Settings Configure appliance date and time settings Verifying port settings, NTP service, and website access Configuring network and security settings Configuring Agent settings Configuring session timeout and auto-refresh settings Configuring locale settings Configure data sharing preferences About DIACAP compliance requirements Configuring Mobile Device Access Enable fast switching for organizations and linked appliances Linking Quest KACE appliances Configuring history settings
Setting up and using labels to manage groups of items Configuring user accounts, LDAP authentication, and SSO Using Replication Shares Managing credentials Configuring assets
About the Asset Management component About managing assets Adding and customizing Asset Types and maintaining asset information Managing Software assets Managing physical and logical assets Maintaining and using manual asset information Managing locations
Setting up License Compliance Managing License Compliance Setting up Service Desk Creating and managing organizations Importing and exporting appliance resources
Managing inventory
Using Device Discovery Managing device inventory
About managing devices Features available for each device management method About inventory information Tracking changes to inventory settings Managing inventory information Finding and managing devices Provisioning the K1000 Agent Manually deploying the K1000 Agent Using Agentless management Adding devices manually in the Administrator Console or by using the API Forcing inventory updates Managing MIA devices Obtaining Dell warranty information
Managing applications on the Software page Managing Software Catalog inventory
About the Software Catalog Viewing Software Catalog information Adding applications to the Software Catalog Managing License assets for Software Catalog applications Using software metering Using Application Control Update or reinstall the Software Catalog
Managing process, startup program, and service inventory Writing custom inventory rules
Deploying packages to managed devices
Distributing software and using Wake-on-LAN Broadcasting alerts to managed devices Running scripts on managed devices Managing Mac profiles
Patching devices and maintaining security
About patch management Subscribing to and downloading patches Creating and managing patch schedules Managing patch inventory Managing Dell devices and updates Maintaining device and appliance security
Using reports and scheduling notifications Monitoring servers
Getting started with server monitoring Working with monitoring profiles Managing monitoring for devices Working with alerts
Using the Service Desk
Configuring Service Desk Managing Service Desk tickets, processes, and reports
Overview of Service Desk ticket lifecycle Creating tickets from the Administrator Console and User Console Creating and managing tickets by email Viewing tickets and managing comments, work, and attachments Using the ticket escalation process Using Service Desk processes Using Ticket Rules Run Service Desk reports Archiving, restoring, and deleting tickets Managing ticket deletion
Managing Service Desk ticket queues About User Downloads and Knowledge Base articles Customizing Service Desk ticket settings Configuring SMTP email servers
Maintenance and troubleshooting
Maintaining the appliance Troubleshooting the K1000
Appendixes Glossary About us Legal notices

Getting values from a device (Custom Inventory Field)

Getting values from a device (Custom Inventory Field)

The rules that end with ValueReturn enable you to gather information from the device. You can use these rules to collect information that the K1000 Agent normally does not collect.

The returned values are set with the custom application display name (Title). This appears on the Device Detail page under Software in Installed Programs and Custom Inventory Fields.

Use the Custom Inventory Field values to manage installations and to distribute software as well as reports, View By filtering, Smart Label search criteria, or any other process that can be performed with an automatically detected setting.

This section covers the following topics:

Value Return rule reference

The following table shows all available value return rules that you can use to set a Custom Inventory Field :

Syntax

Win

RHEL

OS X

Description

RegistryValueReturn (registryPath, valueName, type)

X

Returns the value of a registry entry, and sets the datatype to the one you specified.

EnvironmentalVariableReturn (var, type) Specifying environment or user variables

X

X

X

Returns the value of an environment variable, and sets the datatype to the one you specified.

FileInfoReturn (path, attribute, type)

X

X

X

Returns the value of a file attribute, see valid types in Defining rule arguments.

ShellCommandTextReturn (command)

X

X

X

Returns the output of the command, and sets the datatype to TEXT.

ShellCommandDateReturn (command)

X

X

X

Returns the output of the command, and sets the datatype to DATE.

ShellCommandNumberReturn (command)

X

X

X

Returns the output of the command, and sets the datatype to NUMBER.

PlistValueReturn (fullpath, entry, type)

X

Returns the value of the PLIST key, and sets the datatype to TEXT, NUMBER, or DATE.

Getting File Information values

You can set the Custom Inventory Field to any of the Windows File Information attributes using the FileInfoReturn rule.

Example: Getting Windows Internet Explorer product version

The following example sets the Custom Inventory Field for the Internet Explorer Product Version as a NUMBER:

In the Custom Inventory Field, enter the following:

Getting registry key values

You can set the Custom Inventory Field to a registry key using the RegistryValueReturn rule. Where the registryPath (on left) is the path to the entry, the valueName (on right) is the key you want to return.The illustration shows Registry Editor, with a directory tree panel on the left, and name, type and data on the right.

Example: Getting the Internet Explorer ProductID key

To set the ProductID registry key as a Custom Inventory Field:

Getting command output

Command rules enable you to set the output of a command to a Custom Inventory Field. The command depends on the command interpreter and executable path on the device.

For example, on Windows devices you can write MS-DOS commands, but not Cygwin-style UNIX commands unless Cygwin is installed and available in the default path for all users.

Use any of the following rules to set the output of the command to a Custom Inventory Field:

Example: Getting uptime on a Mac OS X

To set the uptime as a Custom Inventory Field:

Getting PLIST values

PlistValueReturn rules enable you to set a Property List (PList) key as a Custom Inventory Field.

Example: Getting the system locale

To distribute applications using Managed Installations based on the native language, enter the following rule to get the device locale and then create a corresponding Smart Label that is applied to the device based on the language code reported by the K1000 Agent in the Custom Inventory Field:

Getting multiple values

Join ValueReturn rules using either the AND or OR operator. The rule shows the application as an Installed Program, if any of the values are not empty.

The joined values are all set in the same Custom Inventory Field separated by the operator and therefore are technically considered for the purposes of Search Criteria, filters, reports, and other appliance processes as TEXT.

ValueReturn rules joined by the:

In the Custom Inventory field, join rules using the following syntax:


Function(arguments...) AND Function(arguments) AND ...

Separate the conditional statements from the operator with spaces. Do not join AND and OR operators in the same rule.

Matching filenames to regular expressions

Matching filenames to regular expressions

Regular expressions match a character or the specified string to the filenames in the specified directory.

This section describes the regular expressions that match filenames in Conditional and Value Return rules using a regular expression.

Understanding regular expressions

Understanding regular expressions

You can use regular expression syntax to match filenames.

The following table provides an overview of the regular expression syntax used to match filenames:

Character

Description

Example Expression

Target Files

Files Matched

(any string)

Non-special characters match any filename that contains the string.

abc

abcFile.xls

Example.jpg

File.doc

Myabc.txt

MyFile.abc

abcFile.xls

Myabc.txt

MyFile.abc

.

Dot matches any single character. When entered alone it matches all files.

.

abcFile.xls

Example.jpg

File.doc

Myabc.txt

MyFile.abc

abcFile.xls

Example.jpg

File.doc

Myabc.txt

MyFile.abc

\

Backslash is used to escape a special character and for creating a back-reference.

For more information, go to http://rexegg.com/regex-capture.html.

.*\.txt$

abcFile.xls

Example.jpg

File.doc

Myabc.txt

MyFile.abc

Myabc.txt

^

Caret matches the characters you specify to the start of the filename.

^k

install.exe

kinstaller.exe

runkbot.bat

kinstaller.exe

|

Pipe separates a list of options to match.

run|install

install.exe

kinstaller.exe

runkbot.bat

install.exe

kinstaller.exe

runkbot.bat

$

Dollar matches the characters you specify to the end of the filename.

bat$

install.exe

kinstaller.exe

runkbot.bat

runkbot.bat

?

Question mark makes the preceding character optional in matches.

\.log10?$

a.log1

afile.txt3

app.log

appconf.log11

mylog.log10

a.log1

mylog.log10

*

Asterisk matches the preceding character zero or more times.

\.log1*$

a.log1

afile.txt3

app.log

appconf.log11

mylog.log10

a.log1

app.log

appconf.log11

+

Plus matches the preceding character one or more times.

ap+.*\.log

a.log1

afile.txt3

app.log

appconf.log11

mylog.log10

app.log

appconf.log11

[ ]

Brackets enclose a character class and match any character within the brackets.

Character class special character rules differ from normal regular expressions.

[123]

a.log1

afile.txt3

app.log

appconf.log11

mylog.log10

a.log1

afile.txt3

appconf.log11

mylog.log10

()

Parentheses enclosing characters create a back reference and match the preceding characters and/or the enclosed characters.

For more information, go to http://rexegg.com/regex-capture.html.

(p)\1

a.log1

afile.txt3

app.log

appconf.log11

mylog.log10

app.log

appconf.log11

{n}

Curly brackets repeat the preceding character the number of specified times, where n is greater than or equal to 1.

{p}\.log$

a.log1

afile.txt3

app.log

appconf.log11

mylog.log10

app.log

Regular Expression Rule Reference

Regular Expression Rule Reference

The syntax of a regular expression rule varies slightly from the other File rules. The fullpath argument is a string that matches the absolute path to the file location, but does not include name of the file. The filename is specified as a separate argument using a regular expression.

The following table provides a list of rules that allow you to use regular expressions.

Syntax

Win

RHEL

OS X

Description

FilenamesMatchingRegexExist (fullpath,regex)

X

X

X

Returns true if any files in the specified directory match the filename you entered using a regular expression.

FilenamesMatchingRegexGreaterThan (fullpath,regex,value)

X

X

X

True if the number of files that match is more than the value.

FilenamesMatchingRegexLessThan (fullpath,regex,value)

X

X

X

True if the number of files that match is less than the value.

FilenamesMatchingRegexEqual (fullpath,regex,value)

X

X

X

True if the number of files that match is the same as the value.

FilenamesMatchingRegexReturn (fullpath,regex,type)

X

X

X

Sets the Custom Inventory Field to the matching filenames (includes path).

Related Documents