Coexistence Manager for Notes 3.7.1 - Quick Start Guide

About the CMN documentation suite

Release Notes (printable PDF): Describes the current CMN release—any new and enhanced features, resolved issues, and known issues. Also documents minimum installation requirements, and provides Dell contact information.
Quick-Start Guide (printable PDF): An orientation to the product's basic purposes, features and capabilities, with a case study showing how its primary components are most commonly used within a typical coexistence scenario. Also explains how to download and install the software.
CMN User Guide (printable PDF): Comprehensive documentation of CMN's three primary components: Directory Connector, Mail Connector and Free/Busy Connector. Describes component capabilities, deployment considerations, configuration instructions and tips, and application notes and screen-by-screen field notes for CMN's Management Console software tools.
FBC Scenarios Guide (printable PDF): Provides process instructions and application notes for installing and configuring CMN’s Free/Busy Connector (FBC) in a variety of Exchange-side scenarios.
CMN Program Parameters Reference (printable PDF): Listing of all CMN program parameters that are not associated with UI fields in CMN’s Management Console, with descriptions and default values and usage/application notes. (Parameters associated with UI fields do appear in the Configuration.xml files, but should not be edited manually.)
Management Console Online Help (three compiled Windows Help files, one for each CMN component): Field notes and application notes for the screens and features of CMN’s Management Console.

Was this topic helpful?

[Select Rating]



Where To Look in the CMN Documentation

The CMN application Help files contain the same information as the User Guide, but make the information available on-screen at a single keystroke (from the CMN Management Console).

Was this topic helpful?

[Select Rating]



Product overview

Coexistence is the state of two or more independent servers when all are serving the same organization at the same time. For example, when a company using a particular brand of email and calendar applications acquires another company that uses a different brand, the new company may decide to let everyone continue using their familiar tools. The company then must find a way for people in both groups to be able to communicate and collaborate effectively, and uneventfully, with everyone else in the new company. They should be able to email one another without knowing or caring which server serves which users, and messages should be received on all servers with the same attributes and functionality and attachments they had when they left their senders. Moreover, people should be able to send meeting invitations that ping the invitees’ calendars and notify them of any conflicts, again without regard to which servers host which users’ free/busy data. And of course the company will want some way to coordinate the two independent directories of the two environments.

Was this topic helpful?

[Select Rating]



The challenges of a Notes–Exchange coexistence

Directory coexistence: Most organizations routinely experience staff additions, departures and transfers. These staff changes introduce data inconsistencies between the two environments’ directories. A directory update reconciles these differences by updating the contents of one directory to match the contents of another. A bidirectional update ensures that both directories contain all of the organization’s users, resources and groups.
Mail coexistence: Simple, direct SMTP mail routing is easy to configure, but does not preserve or compensate for substantial cross-platform losses in the fidelity of message contents: attributes, attachments, calendar data, and so forth. Notes and Exchange environments offer similar email and calendar capabilities, but implement many features differently. Outlook therefore does not handle certain message types that originate in Notes, and vice versa. Often the recipient client can display the pertinent information correctly, but cannot perform the calendar updates that would have been automatic if the recipient and sender were using the same email system. Or sometimes the receiving client can perform automatic calendar updates, but introduces errors— incorrect times, missing dates, or extraneous meetings, etc.
Free/Busy coexistence: The Notes and Exchange environments implement calendar free/busy queries differently, making each side blind to the availability status of users on the other systems. The calendar applications on both sides need some mechanism to determine the free/busy status of users within the other environment.

Was this topic helpful?

[Select Rating]



Self Service Tools
Knowledge Base
Product Support
Software Downloads
Technical Documentation
User Forums
Video Tutorials
Related Documents