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Active Administrator 8.4 - User Guide

Active Administrator Overview Certificates Security & Delegation Azure Active Directory  Active Directory Health
Switching to Active Directory Health Using the Active Directory Health landing page Installing Active Directory Health Analyzer agents Using the Active Directory Health Analyzer agent configuration utility Excluding domain controllers Managing the Remediation Library Analyzing Active Directory health Analyzing Azure Active Directory Managing Active Directory Health Analyzer alerts Managing alert notifications Pushing alerts to System Center Operations Manager and SNMP managers Managing monitored domain controllers Managing data collectors Active Directory Health Templates Managing Active Directory Health Analyzer agents Using the Troubleshooter Recovering Active Directory Health data
Auditing & Alerting Group Policy Active Directory Recovery Active Directory Infrastructure DC Management DNS Management Configuration
Using the Configuration landing page Managing tasks Defining role-based access Setting email server options Configuring SCOM and SNMP Settings Configuring Azure Active Directory Setting notification options Setting Active Template options Setting agent installation options Setting recovery options Setting GPO history options Setting certificate configuration Setting service monitoring policy Managing archive databases Migrating data to another database Setting a preferred domain controller Setting up workstation logon auditing Managing configuration settings Setting user options Managing the Active Directory server
Diagnostic Console Alerts Appendix
Domain controller alerts
Active Directory Certificate Services service is not running Active Directory Domain Services is not running Active Directory Web Services service is not running Consecutive replication failures DC cache hits DC DIT disk space DC DIT log file disk space DC LDAP load DC LDAP response too slow DC Memory Usage DC properties dropped DC RID pool low DC SMB connections DC SYSVOL disk space DC time sync lost Detected NO_CLIENT_SITE record DFS Replication service not running DFS service is not running DFSR conflict area disk space DFSR conflict files generated DFSRS CPU load DFSR RDC not enabled DFSR sharing violation DFSR staged file age DFSR staging area disk space DFSR USN records accepted DFSRS unresponsive DFSRS virtual memory DFSRS working set DNS Client Service is not running Domain controller CPU load Domain controller page faults Domain controller unresponsive File Replication Service is not running File replication (NTFRS) staging space free in kilobytes GC response too slow Group policy object inconsistent Hard disk drive Intersite Messaging Service is not running Invalid primary DNS domain controller address Invalid secondary DNS domain controller address KDC service is not running LSASS CPU load LSASS virtual memory LSASS working set Missing SRV DNS record for either the primary or secondary DNS server NETLOGON not shared NetLogon service is not running Orphaned group policy objects exist Review the reported orphaned GPO folders in the local SYSVOL and remove any that are obsolete. Physical memory Power supply Primary DNS resolver is not responding Secondary DNS resolver is not responding Security Accounts Manager Service is not running SRV record is not registered in DNS SYSVOL not shared W32Time service is not running Workstation Service is not running
Domain alerts Site alerts Forest alerts Azure Active Directory Connect alerts
Event Definitions PowerShell cmdlets

Domain controller page faults

Indicates that the performance of the server may be degraded because of too many page faults.

Category: Performance Counters
Name: Memory page faults a second
Supported on: Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016, and Windows Server 2019
Required permissions: When monitored locally and remotely, only domain user privilege is required and the user must be a part of the Performance Logs user group.

The Directory Analyzer agent constantly monitors the Page Faults/sec performance counter on the domain controller. If this number exceeds the configured threshold, the agent will issue an alert.

A page fault occurs whenever the operating system tries to access a virtual memory page that is not currently in memory or is in the incorrect place in memory. The process requesting the page must wait while the operating system makes room for the requested page in memory and reads it from disk or relocates it, which may cause a significant delay for the faulting process. If many processes are causing page faults, a condition known as thrashing can occur. If this happens, the performance of the server goes to zero as the operating system spends most of its time managing memory and very little running applications.

A continuously high page fault rate is an indication that the server is running too many processes with insufficient real memory. If left unattended, Active Directory® performance will suffer greatly, and eventually the directory system agent (DSA) will be unable to service requests, which can result in failed logins and authentications, as well as the inability of some applications and services to run at all.

First, determine if the page fault rate is too high or if the threshold is set too low. Assess the overall performance of the server while the page fault rate is high. If the performance seems adequate, increase the threshold; if the performance seems poor, try to reduce the page fault rate.

To reduce the page fault rate on the server, determine if the page faults are due to a single process or a combination of several processes.

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Select View | Select Columns.
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Select Memory Delta and Page Fault Delta, if necessary.

If there is only one process, run that program on another server or at a different time when the server is not as loaded.

If there are several processes that are generating high page fault rates, you will either have to run some of them on another server, or you will have to add more RAM to the server.

Domain controller unresponsive

Supported on: Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016, and Windows Server 2019
Required permissions: Domain user privilege required.

Active Administrator Data Service (ADS) periodically monitors TCP port 135. If ADS cannot connect to port 135, the alert is triggered.

This error can occur if any of the following occurs:

File Replication Service is not running

Indicates the File Replication Service is currently not running on the domain controller.

Category: Windows Services
Name: File Replication Service
Supported on: Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016, and Windows Server 2019
Required permissions: When monitored locally or remotely, domain administrator privilege is required.

The Directory Analyzer agent periodically checks to ensure the File Replication Service is running.

Use the Services MCC snap-in or another SCP application to restart the File Replication Service.

File replication (NTFRS) staging space free in kilobytes

Indicates that the amount of disk space allocated for staging files during replication is less than or equal to the specified threshold.

Category: Performance Counters
Name: File replication staging space free in kilobytes
Supported on: Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016, and Windows Server 2019
Required permissions: When monitored locally and remotely, only domain user privilege is required and the user must be a part of the Performance Logs user group.

The Directory Analyzer agent monitors the FileReplicaSet\KB of Staging Space Free performance counter on the domain controller. If the value of the performance counter drops below the configured threshold for a period exceeding the configured duration, the agent will set this alert condition.

If the File Replication Service (FRS) runs out of staging disk space, replication will stop. The size of the contents of the staging areas for all active replication sets are subtracted from the user controlled size.

A low disk space condition can be due to many different things. Some possibilities are:

One possible solution is to increase the amount of space allowed for file staging.

The HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\NtFrs\Parameters\ReplicaSet registry key contains one or more sub-keys using a GUID as the key name for each active replica set. Each replica set contains both a Replica Set Root and Replica Set Stage value.
The Replica Set Root value describes the file system folder that will be replicated.
The Replica Set Stage value describes the folder that is used for the staging area. The staging areas can be inspected to determine which one(s) are consuming disk space.
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Check the amount of space allocated by viewing the Staging Space Limit in KB value under the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\NtFrs registry key. This value defines the maximum amount of disk space that can be consumed by all staging areas at any one time.

If the problem cannot be resolved by adjusting the amount of space needed and allowed, turn your attention towards replication schedules and the connectivity between computers. The SYSVOL share is replicated between all domain controllers in the same domain. Other replication partners can be found using the Distributed File System (DFS) console.

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Use the Active Directory® Sites and Services snap-in to confirm that replication schedules allow replication partners to communicate.
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